4154772__Organizational_Behavior_

4154772__Organizational_Behavior_ - Organizational Behavior...

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Organizational Behavior 1 Running head: ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR: TERMINOLOGY AND CONCEPTS Organizational Behavior: Terminology and Concepts [Author’s Name] [Institution’s Name]
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Organizational Behavior 2 Organizational Behavior: Terminology and Concepts In order to understand the key subject of organizational behavior, one needs to know its terminologies and concepts with much clarity. The reason is very simple. As a matter of fact, we all participate in various organizations—such as schools, companies, and hospitals— throughout our lives, and we devote a large percentage of our time to such participation. Most people would like to function more effectively in organizations and to contribute to more effective functioning of the organizations themselves. It seems logical that the more we know about organizations and the way they operate, the better should be our chances of coping with them adequately and of achieving our own goals within them and for them. This process of creating knowledge is what theories and concepts of organizational behavior including with all terminologies attempt to do. Following are the brief explanations of the subject of organizational behavior with some of its key terminologies used widely while studying thus subject: Organizational behavior: Organizational behavior is essentially concerned with what people do in organizations. Since the subject matter is behavior, it ought to lend itself to a scientific approach. But it is necessary to keep in mind that when people are brought together in organizations, they behave differently. To hold this idea in sharp focus it is useful to keep the basic psychological process in mind—perception, emotion, and action. In organizations, people see the world differently than they do as individuals; they experience peculiar feelings, and act or behave in strange ways. For example, studies of chief executives by Chris Argyris found that they believe in a rather aristocratic manner that places their subordinates in win-lose situations and generates feelings of dependency among them. In such a context subordinates are more likely to agree with the boss. (Randall, Julian 2004) In terms of the psychological process, they perceive the boss as threatening. They feel apprehensive, and they act in a conforming manner.
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Organizational Behavior 3 While bosses would be the last to admit this autocratic attitude, they are quite expert in winning consent. Perhaps from the superior’s point of view the process could be called consensus formation . Irrespective of the subtle differences between conformity and consensus, this is what organizations are all about—focusing people’s behavior on the task to be achieved. The organization is structuring their space, processing their behavior, and forming their values. Organizational Culture: The idea of organizational culture has captured the imagination of
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4154772__Organizational_Behavior_ - Organizational Behavior...

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