3887288__Samuel_Beckettinitial_draft_

3887288__Samuel_Beckettinitial_draft_ - Rethinking Western...

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Rethinking Western Thought 1 Running head: RETHINKING WESTERN THOUGHT IN BECKETT'S DRAMA Rethinking Western Thought in Beckett's Drama [Author’s Name] [Institution’s Name]
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Rethinking Western Thought 2 Abstract Almost all great writers have had to suffer neglect at certain moments in their careers, usually at the outset (when their language is condemned as either too outré or too derivative) and again when they have moved beyond the work or works that have made them famous, and entered upon a 'late' period, characterized by an extremely personal and idiosyncratic use of language, 'to set', in T.S. Eliot's words, 'the crown upon a lifetime's effort'. In the case of Samuel Beckett this paradigm is partially confirmed and partially negated, for whilst Beckett has only gradually (and in some cases grudgingly) been accorded classic status, there has recently been considerable critical activity, on both sides of the Atlantic, devoted to demonstrating that in this case, despite the inherent difficulty of his work, the artist has not escaped the critics in pursuit of him. There is no doubt an element of compensation here, designed in some way to make up for the years of penury and disfavor that came before the fame and fortune. In this work, something of this kind is attempted here, although it will be clear that the approach is nothing like as unconventional as it might have been. The business of evolving a language more appropriate and adaptive has been considered a matter secondary to the need for a coherent and integrated account of what 'late' Beckett is about, and where Beckett may be adjudged to have been successful (or unsuccessful) in emulating those works, like Waiting for Godot or Molloy , that first established him as a writer of stature and originality. Key Words: language, postmodernist literature, drama, fiction
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Rethinking Western Thought 3 Introduction The critical response to the fiction of the Irish-born author, Samuel Beckett, has been overwhelming. Numerous books and thousands of articles have been published on Beckett, primarily in Europe, the United States and Canada. Since Beckett wrote most of his works in French and translated them himself into English and later selectively into German, French, British, American, Canadian and German critics were not only able to read Beckett's works in their original version, but also had the opportunity to compare one version to another. The diversity of the approaches to Beckett's oeuvre has been as varied as the individuals writing about him: historical, philosophical, thematic, formalist, structuralist, and psychological studies, among others, analyze the content and style of Beckett's works, while biographical and manuscript studies give insight into the genesis of his fiction. In this paper, review articles which document the journalists' and critics' initial reactions
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2010 for the course MANAGEMENT EM-14793 taught by Professor Lindaryaan during the Spring '08 term at Windsor.

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3887288__Samuel_Beckettinitial_draft_ - Rethinking Western...

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