7593793__Civil_War_and_Reconstruction_

7593793__Civil_War_and_Reconstruction_ - Civil War and...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Civil War and Reconstruction 1 Running head: CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION: HISTORY Civil War and Reconstruction: History [Author’s Name] [Institution’s Name] Civil War and Reconstruction 2 Confederacy’s Defeat in the Civil War Between December 21, 1860, and February 1, 1861, before Lincoln had even been inaugurated, the seven states of the Deep South seceded from the Union. Efforts to find a suitable compromise in Congress failed, as all proposals except a proposed thirteenth amendment forever guaranteeing slavery in the southern states were rejected. Congress adjourned with a sense of futility and hopelessness. Six weeks later, the Civil War began when Lincoln dispatched a relief expedition to Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor, South Carolina. Confederate leaders chose to open fire on the federal garrison in the fort rather than let the Union fleet land supplies. The attack on Fort Sumter galvanized public opinion in both sections, and men and women fervently rallied to the cause of the Union or the Confederacy. Matters had moved beyond compromise. In April 1861, Northerners and Southerners alike rejected the democratic process and turned to war to resolve their differences. The disruption of the Union and the outbreak of war represented the ultimate failure of American democracy. Why had the Confederacy failed? The Confederacy had successfully contained sectional animosities for a long time, only to falter abysmally in this final crisis, which it had not come close to solving. This failure had momentous consequences, for the American Confederacy was the major mechanism to deal with and defuse the sectional conflict. For one thing, it placed certain limits on dissent. Confederacy was not free to take any position concerning sectional confrontations. Instead, they had pay some heed to the national ramifications of their ideological stance and behavior, since whatever the Confederacy did in one state affected the Confederacy future in other states. Civil War and Reconstruction 3 The Reconstruction Phase From the point of view of social and political science in general, the South bulks largest in the history of reconstruction. But our point of view is different. We must regard the period as a step in the progress of the American nation. In this aspect the North claims our principal attention. The social, economic, and political forces that wrought positively for progress are to be found in the record, not of the vanquished, but of the victorious section. In this record there is less that is spectacular, less that is pathetic, and more that seems inexcusably sordid than in the record of the South; but moral and dramatic values must not have greater weight in the writing than they have had in the making of history. Our narrative, therefore, while it may seem to slight the picturesque details of Ku-Klux operations and carpet-bag legislation and fraud, will be found,...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 11/29/2010 for the course MANAGEMENT EM-14793 taught by Professor Lindaryaan during the Spring '08 term at Windsor.

Page1 / 9

7593793__Civil_War_and_Reconstruction_ - Civil War and...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online