Chap6Lec - DRAFT (Chap 6) Page 1 Chap 6 Chemical Equations...

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DRAFT (Chap 6) Page 1 Chap 6 Chemical Equations and Reactions (Rxns) coefficient x subscript = total number of atoms of elements in compound How many H atoms are contained in CH 4 (a reactant)? How many H atoms are contained in O 2 (a reactant)? How many H atoms are contained in CO 2 (a product)? How many H atoms are contained in H 2 O (a product)?
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DRAFT (Chap 6) Page 2 This is a balanced equation; the number of H atoms in the reactants equals the number of H atoms in the products. KEY POINTS ABOUT CHEMICAL EQUATIONS ►Chemical reactions neither create nor destroy atoms ►Changing a subscript in a formula changes the identity of the compound ►Changing the coefficient changes the relative amount used or produced in the reaction, but does not change the identity of the compound. Coefficients must be changed to balance an equation.
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DRAFT (Chap 6) Page 3 Chemical equation is a “recipe”. 1. The subscripts provide the ratio of atoms within a compound 2. The coefficients provide the ratio of a compound to the other compounds in the reaction . This ratio is in terms of moles, molecules or formula units (NOT in terms of mass!)
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DRAFT (Chap 6) Page 4 Some more abbreviations CaCO 3 (s) CaO(s) + CO 2 (g) CaCO 3 (s) CaO(s) + CO 2 (g) 2H 2 (g) + CO(g) CH 3 OH(g “Catalyst”
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DRAFT (Chap 6) Page 5 Balancing Equations Lots of trial and error, but there are some guidelines that will help. ►NEVER EVER change subscripts ►It often helps to set up a chart of # of atoms in reactants and in products ►Try to first balance elements that occur in the fewest chemical formulas, such as those that appear in only one reactant and one product. ►If there is more than one element that only occurs in only one reactant and one product, start with the element that has the largest number of atoms (largest subscripts). ►Wait until almost the end of the balancing procedure to assign coefficients
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2010 for the course CHEM 101 taught by Professor Stegemiller during the Winter '07 term at Ohio State.

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Chap6Lec - DRAFT (Chap 6) Page 1 Chap 6 Chemical Equations...

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