Chap9Lec - DRAFT (Chap 9) Page 1 Solution Solvent the...

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DRAFT (Chap 9) Page 1 Solution Solvent – the substance present in the largest quantity in a solution Solute—the substance dissolved in the solvent
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DRAFT (Chap 9) Page 2 Concentration – amount of solute in the solution (lots of possible units) ―Concentrated‖ vs. ―Dilute‖ Saturated Sol’n– as much solute is in the solvent as can possibly be dissolved (usually temperature dependent) Unsaturated Sol’n – some solute is dissolved, but more can still be dissolved. Solubility – a quantitative * amount indicating the concentration in a saturated sol’n. (a variety of units are possible, temperature is always stated) * Often if asked about the solubility of a compound, a qualitative answer is also given. For example when looking up the ―solubility‖ of NaCl it would not be unusual to read that it is soluble in water but insoluble in hexane (no quantitative statement).
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DRAFT (Chap 9) Page 3 Percent Concentration (four types for Chem 101): weight/weight (any units as long as they are all the same) weight/volume (tricky units) volume/volume (any units as long as they are all the same)
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DRAFT (Chap 9) Page 4 Parts per million (ppm) 1 ppm means 1 part solute/1,000,000 parts solvent EX: 1.0 mole CO 2 /1,000,000 moles N 2 would be 1 ppm CO 2 in N 2 EX: 2.0 moles CO 2 /4500 moles N 2 would be: (should use the same units for numerator and denominator and can calculate ppm as volume/volume or mass/mass. If not specifically noted, gases are usually volume/volume and liquid and solid solutions are usually mass/mass) Important note for aqueous sol’ns: 1 g water ≈ 1 mL
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(Chap 9) Page 5 Molarity (most popular concentration unit for chemists!) Rearrange this equation Include liters x mols/ltr = moles and moles x liters/mole = liters
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2010 for the course CHEM 101 taught by Professor Stegemiller during the Winter '07 term at Ohio State.

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Chap9Lec - DRAFT (Chap 9) Page 1 Solution Solvent the...

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