reading # 3

reading # 3 - CHAPTER 2 Understanding Interests,...

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CHAPTER 2 Understanding Interests, Interactions, and Institutions After Saddam Hussein refused to give up power as the Leader of Iraq in 2003, the U.S. military quickly defeated the Iraqi army. Hussein was eventually captured, turned over to the new Iraqi government, and executed. The demolition of this large statue of Hussein in Baghdad in April 2003 symbolized Hussein’s fall from power. How can we understand Hussein’s decision to risk war with a much more powerful country? 040-079_WP_CH02.indd 40 040-079_WP_CH02.indd 40 4/1/09 8:54:45 AM 4/1/09 8:54:45 AM
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Interests: What Do Actors Want from Politics? P Actors and Interests Interactions: Why Can't an Actor Always Get What It Wants? P Cooperation and Bargaining P When Can Actors Cooperate? P Who Wins and Who Loses in Bargaining? Institutions: Do Rules Matter in World Politics? P How Do Institutions Affect Cooperation? P Whom Do Institutions BeneF t? P Why ±ollow the Rules? Conclusion: Thinking Analytically about World Politics O n March 19, 2003, the United States launched a pre- ventive war against Iraq. Tensions between the two countries had remained high since August 1990, when Iraq invaded Kuwait—its small, oil-rich neighbor—and the United States led a multinational coalition to war to restore sov- ereignty to Kuwait. As a condition of the ceaseF re that ended the 1991 war, Iraq agreed to eliminate its programs to develop nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons and permit United Nations inspectors to monitor its compliance. ±or most of the next decade, the United Nations and Iraq played a game of hide-and-seek as the weapons inspectors sought to enforce the ban on weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and the Iraqi government attempted to under- mine the inspections regime and its attendant economic sanctions. Arguing that in 2002 Iraq’s WMD programs were rapidly reach- ing fruition and concerned that Iraq might use its new weapons to assert itself in the region, the administration of President George W. Bush decided to remove Iraq’s dictator, Saddam Hussein, from power—by force if necessary. President Bush may also have been seeking to assert American power in the world, to demonstrate a new and more aggressive foreign policy, to secure supplies of oil from the Persian Gulf, and to transform the Middle East by building an effective democracy in an important but previously authoritarian country. The United States turned to the Security Council of the United Nat ions (UNSC) to support its po l icy of reg ime change in Iraq, threatening that the organization would become irrelevant if it failed to enforce its own resolutions on Iraq’s weapons programs. The United States faced determined opposition from ±rance, Russia, and 040-079_WP_CH02.indd 41 040-079_WP_CH02.indd 41 4/1/09 8:54:50 AM 4/1/09 8:54:50 AM
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42 | CHAPTER 2 | UNDERSTANDING INTERESTS, INTERACTIONS, AND INSTITUTIONS China, all of which can veto any substantive resolu- tion within the UNSC.
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2010 for the course IR 109 taught by Professor Heinz during the Spring '10 term at Rochester.

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reading # 3 - CHAPTER 2 Understanding Interests,...

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