reading # 42 fortuna

reading # 42 fortuna - DOES PEACEKEEPING WORK? SHAPING...

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DOES PEACEKEEPING WORK? SHAPING BELLI(~ERE]\;TS' CH()ICES AFTER CIVIL \.VAR Virginia Page FOl'1na U 'ii~U'~;""""~'t'y if\~" ~fH'\~If"f\Tm.D Ivl vtrl~i tOt' hULr t~~ 'tn P R I '" C E TON U '" I \' E R SIT Y PRE S S P R INC E T () N .\ N D 0 X FOR [)
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Copyright C0 2008 by Princeton University Press Published by Princeton University Press, 41 vVillia1l1 Street, Princeton, New Jcrsey 08540 In the United Kingdom: Princetoll University 6 Oxford Woodstock, Oxfonlshire OX20 IT\V All Rights Reserved Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Fortna, Virginia Page Does peacekeeping work? : shaping belligerents' choices after civil war I Virginia Page Fortna. p. em. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 978-0-691-1328\-5 1. Peaec-building. 2. Peace-building-Case studies. 3. Civil war--Case studies. I. Title. JZ5538.F672007 H1.5'84-dc22 2007047168 Dara is available British This book has been couUlosed 111 Printed on acid-free paper. press. prin ecton. ed 1I Printed in the United States or America 3 5 7 9 10 8 6 4 2 For Pete
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Four A CAUSAL THEORY OF PEACEKEEPIKG THE PROBLEMS \VITH PEACEKEEPINC are legion. Peacekeeping missions are often thrown into eonflicts when the great powers want to be sel'n as "doing something" but do not really want to act. Mission mandates are often ambiguous, reflecting the lowest common denominator of agreement ;1l1l0ng sending states and among the belligen.:nts themselves. PelCe operations are usually improvised and ad hoc; they are too at the last minute and are perennially understaffed, and llnderequipped. ";\1uddling through has been the order of the <1,1)," in peacekeeping missions.! Troop levels are hased on what memher states are willing to provide, not 011 any realistic assessment of need.' \Vith demand for peacekeeping personnel often outstripping supply, missions are patched together with hegged-for soldiers. If there are choices to be made about who supplies forces, troop-contributing countries are often chosen more for geographic representation than for military effectiveness. Interoperabilt:y of forces is generally poor; troops that ha\'e to work together often clo not even speak a coml11on language. COll1mand and control is loose at !Jest, with soldiers likely to "phone home" hefore complying with orders from the force coml11ander.' The way in which most peacekeeping missions are managed is, frankly, no way to mn an effective military operation. 4 It would thus not be surprising jf the presence of peacekeepers made no di fference at all; if their contribution to stable peace \\;lS virtually nil. i And yet, as we will see in chapter 5, peacekeepers do make a positin: peace is much more likely to last, ceteris paribus, when they are than when they are not. is possihle to argue that this positive effect is simply coincidence, that the efIect is spurious. Studies of peacekeeping frequently note th,lt the I Cousens 199R. p. 'N.
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2010 for the course IR 109 taught by Professor Heinz during the Spring '10 term at Rochester.

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reading # 42 fortuna - DOES PEACEKEEPING WORK? SHAPING...

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