Notes # 5 reading

Notes # 5 reading - Exploring the Bargaining Model of War...

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Exploring the Bargaining Model of War By Dan Reiter The bargaining model of war envisions the initiation, prosecution, termination, and consequences of war as part of a single bargaining process. What is the relationship between politics and war? Carl von Clausewitz: should war be considered as part of politics—that is, politics by other means The bargaining model of war sees war as politics. International politics are disputes over scarce goods - The placement of a border - The composition of a national government - Control over natural resources. Uses of the bargaining model: - To link the causes, prosecution, termination, and consequences of war into a single theoretically consistent process. - Pointing to sometimes overlooked factors, such as disagreements over military capabilities, concerns about the ability to commit to an agreement in the face of changing capabilities, and the potential inability to divide up the goods at stake. Overlooked factors - Disagreements over military capabilities, - Concerns about the ability to commit to an agreement in the face of changing capabilities, - The potential inability to divide up the goods at stake. - Prediction that actors do not always use new information to update their beliefs; the domestic-politics prediction that some leaders prefer to fight, The Bargaining Model of War Economics, “the allocation of scarce resources among unlimited and competing uses,” International politics can be accurately described as the allocation of resources under scarcity. The bargaining model sees the essence of conflict, violent or otherwise, as disagreement over resource allocation and/or policy choice. Explain the resolution of conflict among actors. When some good or resource must be divided among at least two actors, bargaining is “the process of arriving at mutual agreement on the provisions of a contract.” International politics occurs among a small enough group of actors to make models of pure free markets inappropriate; notably, oligopoly models have been applied to international relations. Interstate cooperation: a bargaining problem, in that states negotiate an agreed-upon course of action to advance the goals of all under conditions of scarcity. International institutions facilitate bargaining by providing information and linking different issues. Importantly, the very design of institutions can be understood as bargaining, as the skeleton of an institution represents the distribution of finite resources (veto power, committee structure, voting rules, and so forth).
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Carl von Clausewitz: war is a means of accomplishing political goals and not an end in itself, remarking that “[t]he political object is the goal, war is the means of reaching it, and means can never be considered in isolation from their purpose.” War itself—the actual fighting, aside from the political issues at stake—is always costly. See fighting itself as serving a function: as an expression of cultural or gendered tendencies to
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2010 for the course IR 109 taught by Professor Heinz during the Spring '10 term at Rochester.

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Notes # 5 reading - Exploring the Bargaining Model of War...

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