Notes on reading # 22

Notes on reading # 22 - the eventual retail cost of goods...

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Where Sweatshops Are a Dream Nicholas D. Kristof When:  times of tremendous economic distress and protectionist pressures What: a special danger - tighter labor standards will be used as an excuse to curb trade. Why: - Labor standards can improve wages and working conditions, without greatly affecting the eventual retail cost of goods. - the central challenge in the poorest countries is not that sweatshops exploit too many people, but that they don't exploit enough. False argument: Labor standards can improve wages and working conditions, without greatly affecting
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Unformatted text preview: the eventual retail cost of goods. That's true. But labor standards and "living wages" have a larger impact on production costs that companies are always trying to pare. The result is to push companies to operate more capital-intensive factories in better-off nations, rather than labor-intensive factories in poorer countries The best way to help people in the poorest countries isn't to campaign against sweatshops but to promote manufacturing there....
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2010 for the course PSC 222 taught by Professor Jing during the Spring '10 term at Rochester.

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