AIChESurvey

AIChESurvey - 2907 AIChE Employment & Salary Survey '...

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Unformatted text preview: 2907 AIChE Employment & Salary Survey ' 000% 0 - gigfig d 0osisi0e Edi herine Chemical engineering salaries continue to move on an upward trend. in 2007, chemical engineers broke the $100K barrier — reporting a median salary of $103,730, up 12.6% from two years ago. Furthermore, average starting salaries have risen to nearly $60,000. KRISTINE CHIN, EDlTDR-lN-CHIEF, CEP FEM gs continue to look up for chemical engineering salaries. According to results Erom the recently con— ducted biennial AIChE employment-and-salary survey. chemical engineers enjoyed double—digit growth in income. Based on data from respondents who provided base salary figures, the median annual salary is $103,730 (Table i) — a l2.6% increaSe compared to the median annual salary record- ed in 2005 ($92,150). This is well above the rate of inflation, which the Consumer Price Index reported as 3.2% for the same time period. Similar to how the previous survey was conducted in 2005 {CEP, Aug. 2005, pp. 22—27), a questionnaire was e- mailed in May to members selected at random, excluding members known to be either retirees or students. [Survey methodology details can be found on p. 27.] A total of 2,210 members reSponded, of which: 2,039 (92.3%) are full-time salaried employees; 80 (3.6%) are self-employed, full—time; 55 (2.5%) work part—time, either self- employed or at salaried jobs; 28 (1.3%) are not working, but are seek— ing employment; and 8 (0.4%) are . 'E.Exp'eri$me_.u, unemployed by choice. These data are .: comparable to the 2005 survey. As one would expect, the respon- dents are highly educated — 43% hold only bachelor’s degrees, 22% have master’s degrees, 25% have doc- rorates, and 10% have MBAs. ' Furthermore, 29.5% hold a profes— ' _ 2.10 2.5.020 -' 2610 years 31 10 35- years " Because salaries are highly variable. two measures of ‘ 1-.N1imher'ef '- "fl. . _- Respondents -1sweeile 1000200 Lessihanfiyears'j_-_' "242" ' -'" 510'10yeers_;.'. ' "'._'195_ .' More than 00.01507; :2 55 ' '- Cover Story sional engineer’s (PE) license. Taking a quick look at age and gender, the respondents are primarily male (86%} and have a median age between 46 and 50. Table 2 gives mean and median base salaries* by years of experience. The respondents‘ range of work experience was. for the most part, evenly split with almost 12% of the tMedisin' ’ Year 15"t'i3ecile -3 let-0031100 - 3rd Quartile . 9th DeeiIe . i .' 1092 040.4008. $40,000-,..--.-ss_9,700, 574.500. -..--_005,000 . - seer 542.000]? 050.000.” 3.003.000 300.000. s101.000_:- . 'east'__044,000____""*350000 4000200, . 005.000 3105,0001.” _ 1091*er '_si'4.'5_'00.-.""'sss.000* ' $72,000='-' 500.0005" 0110,000'_"-.. ' 1999:.“549,0'00'vf‘38011000321 077,200 $05,000 . $114,500 - 2001 $53,500girsssoonyi: 004,000 3103.000.” 5124.500?”- - 2005 000.000 -' ' ,_ _ $92350. _ $115,000 $140,000,: 2.000 00.010 5575.000 __ __ _ $100130 5129.400. 5150.000; 003,700, 3. Median-2;},- 5 Mean '3rd ditalliie'isih'decreff- $40,000 :. $56,000 .' s”50;000'-_'~ 868.453 =500,400 -'sst'.000_-f .:se1.200 " _ $72,000": "501.0003. '~-sar.035 --305,000. -..-s11o.520-.-. 001.950- .002.000; .9..sser,000 501.024.. s100‘,000.-- 5121.200:.._. -' "5,527,000 500.0252 104.000 _:_S1G?_.865 - $122,000 ;. $150,000,; sazjem' {500,000, '-'_s_11__0.'000'- 30117000. $135,000 _. 3150.000' .. " 39.16090 .,.;-..$1.U.2.Dlilt. . 31.20.0007,; $129,123 3146.335.” 3180,9003.’ 000.000 ="-'s103,00'0-" $120,000; "5435,00- -.'--s150.000 rj $170,000 002.040 -- ' $100,000 -.'3s127,000- $220,950 $150,000;- 3102000 -- 3159.525 _. 0232.500 _. $10,000 095.2255}; $124,900: .- $140,273 ical" salaries are given — the median (the point where half the salaries are higher and half are lower}. and the mean {the arithmetic average of all the salaries). Means, on he medians. an: affected by extreme values. and in the case of salaries tend to be higher than medians because of a few very high salaries. Thus. the median is the preferred measure ofa typical salary or income, and deciles and quartiles help to convey the variability around the median. Also note that percentages do not always add to 100 due to rounding. Similarly, the numbers of responses do not alwa 5 match the total populations ofa subgroup because some respondents do not answer all QUESIIUHS. Since values based on a very small number of cases are like y to be misleading. minimum sam- ple-Size rules were applied and in some cases no data are tabulated. CE? August 200? Weieheorg/oep 2.5 Cover Story experience; 10% with 6—10 years and 11—15 years; 13% with 16m20 years; 15% with 21—25 years; 18% with 26—30 years; and l4% with 31—35 years of experience. Chemical engineers continue to be relatively loyal to their empioyers. Roughly a quarter (26.0%) have had only one employer. while more than half (56.9%) have had 2—1!» employers; 16.5% have had 5—10 employers; and 0.6% have had 1i or more employers. Various factors affect salary, and can he classified into two major categories ——~ characteristics of the employer (e.g., geographical location, company size and industry) and char— acteristics of the employee (eg, work experience, education, tenure with one’s employer, and degree of supervisory responsibility). What follows is a detailed breakdown according to these two categories. SALARIES BY EMPLOYER CHARACTERISTECS Geographical location. Overall, median salaries are highest in New England and the raid—Atlantic states {com- bined median of $104,333), followed by the South Central states (median of $101,100), and the Mountain and Pacific states (combined median of $100,544). The lowest median salaries are in the North Centrai ($96,830) and South Atiantic ($95,100). Several states with the highest concentra- tions of chemical engineers also had some of the highest salaries (Table 3). New Jersey had the second highest inedi— an salary of $120,000, Texas had the third highest at $117,000 and California had the tenth highest at $109,000. Employer size. Regression analysis shows that, after con- trolling for other factors, including education, gender, region, tenure with the firm and degree of supervisory responsibility, salaries tend to increase as company size increases. Of the 1,996 respondents who were aware of their company size, the median salary for those working for a firm with 5,000 or more empioyees (47% of respondents) is $110,000. This is 5.7% more than those working for a firm with 1.0004399 employees (20.4% of respondents), $03,750; 9.7% more than those working for a firm with 500—999 employees (6.7% of respondents), $99,381; 13.6% more than those working in a firm with 50—499 employees (18.5% of respon— dents), $95,000; 14.8% more than those working in a firm with 1049 employees (6.0% of respondents), $93,750; and 27.3% more than those working in a firm with fewer than 9 employees (1.4% of respondents), $80,000. Function and industry. For job functions reported by more than 50 respondents (Table 4), the highest salaries, as expected, are found in management —— corporate/general ($150,000), plant ($114,000) and project ($110,000). Interestingly, engineering/procnremezit/construction ($114,400); technical service ($113,000); process safety, health and loss prevention ($112,500); and sales and market- 26 'mvweichecrgfcep August 2007' CEP Median: _ State Respondents Mean . __Alahama‘__ ' -_ . -' 5:35.233. ._ $97,333... '- Alaska", '15: Stations" . $139,333? -.'An‘zonaf 5 so" sioooso "'-'-'soo.ooo' - - Arka_nsas_'.-_'_._ I '_ __ 1B" -_3 $91276; . 1_ 880.5001 Calif-3min. 15? '- $113,343 _ "$133,333 'Qol‘o;a33.g"3_1”g .5 41- . _ _ “5131331” ' ' 33301333? : Co'taneciitut"_-'.;'.'~'-_ 231'. . " 3113.441 3333.153:- j' organizer”: ' 27 seam. 5:03.333"; "j Florida‘."-"--'."'?-'5 or -_ ' aortas ' $90000" Georgia . ;. 41- f _. -'__--sm.54o 3135333....- Hawat- '. . '2 ' ' 333,333 . ' - 'sooooo“ ldahdp...” I. _- 1.8. _. .. 3194.072. . 392.400. _ Illinois ' ' :32 $135,253 srossoo lndiana’.._ _. _ as. 3133.335 -_soa.225: . lowa.’ .- 21 $33,373 . sooooo VKansas. _ at. $151,315 .- 5:32.533 _- Kentucky . - so. _ 333,231 2 335.333... Louisiana : so ' 3133.237 31.11333- Maine"; - .. '-'- s. - ' season $33533 ' Maiyland'.- . - _. __ 35: - swam 399.333 Massachusetts -_ _ _ 75 . $123,538 $00,000 'Michlganfln 2 ' i_‘ 72: $134,920 3:02.753 Minnesota _' . . _ " 33"" . _' " $35,333 $133,333 Mississippif'.“ 11 -' _ j $113,273. ,_ 513?,333' - Mis'soori. ' '4? - _- sot-.533 _' ' - 392.3332 - Mo'nrana'". o . - 335.535 .' . . 392.533” . Nebraslta' 13.3: 3112.263 -- 593.3333 - Nevada'.- ._ o. ;_ : $113,511. _. $114,333 Newi—Iéinpshiref ' - 12 - £58,353 _ ' $92,550._ New Jersey _ -' -_ ' 120 . $233,882 $120,000 NewMexito_'_ g .' 22- ' 3135,3533 $135,533 Newtorli" * 373 3135,4533 - 333,333 northeastern“ =""--43 slows “$96,405; Nanhoatota-W'ur-r. s. ' - 394.2%. 333,551 0h:3.--._. -. : '33 - .- -' $33,537 . $93,333 . Oklahoma. .- . 31 ' $113,915... $135,333 ongoing 2r.'__ . 391,333. . ' 331,533 .' Pennsylvania ' . ' 142. ._ ' snooze ' _ 3131,433- "_-Flhode:lsland'~ -_ s" ' $135,375 . ' $133,530” 'so'uihcamt'ria'v .3952- - -' " $97,113 $93,333; ...I's'outhfoakoia*f' "393243 ' - $33,733? .ITennessee‘". _ 52 $133,323 $133,333 ,Texas: ; _ '_ . 293-" . $123,393 . a $117,333- unw.“ " 22 . 533,414 334,333 Venom"; _ 2 . .. $113,533 _ 5113.533 Virginia: 51 - 5123.573 - 3113.333 Washtagton,__r as _ - $134,435 - 334,333 _: lfilesillitginia-._' 23 - 331,429 ; $33,133- .. Wts'cunsnszxg 21:; geese: - sotsoo' . Wyoming' 3} . 7 . . 535.5573 " $32,333- oistrictofcoiumbia' 13 . 595,372 $112,533 Puerto Rico - 15 533,233 $73,333 _ Total Respondents. 2,184 Qverali Margin of Error 2.34% 'Note: Respondentbase is less than the desired threshold for making valid comparisons. Survey Methodology The biennial AIChE Employment 3. Salary Survey was con— ducted using an online survey tool. The sample was drawn from alt active AlChE members with e—mail addresses at the close or’ 2006. Members residing outside the U.S. or over the age of 70 were exciuded from the original sample frame. The survey sample was drawn from the universe or 25,247 members meeting the above criteria. Since A£ChE membership is not distributed evenly across US. geography, states with smaller member populations were over-sampéed. A simple ran- dom sample was drawn from the 10 states with the largest membership (approximately 60% of US—based members). Extensive compartmentalization of data at every step ensured that no response could be traced back to a single individual. A total of 10,073 invitations were sent via e-mait in May 200? with a 2-week response deadline. One reminder mailing was sent during the response window. From those invited. 2,353 responses were received — a response rate of 23.46%. White the value of response rates is subject to discussion, the response rate is in Iéne with those seen in other AIChE surveys and. more generalty, in commercial market research. The membership of AlChE is a self—selected population and may not be representative of the population of chemical engi- neers residing and working in the U.S. Surveys in prior years have reported resutts within the margin of error for the findings of other employment surveys reporting on chemical engineers conducted at the same time. This is consistent with what is generally seen in homogenous populations. However. the results reported are not projectaole as population parameters in keeping with sampling theory. lug ($105,500) also came in as some of the highest paid pro~ fessionals. The functional areas with the most respondents, research and devetopment, and process engineering, came in at median salaries of $103,200 and $100,000, respectively. Salaries at the tower and of the spectrum include those in government/regulatory affairs ($86,800) and education with- out consulting (S87,000). For those in education who atso consult, there is a noticeable increase in median saiary — up nearly 21% to $105,000. From an industry perspective ("Fabio 5). median salaries are highest ($122,500 and above) in petroleum—related industries — pctrochcmicais and petroleum products ($127,000), oilfictd services and exploration ($123,000). and petroleum production/refining ($122,500). Industries with the most number of respondents came in towards the higher end of the scale. These include engineering/desigo/ construction/consulting ($106,350), specialty chemicals ($103,000) and pharmaceuticals ($105,000). The oniy cater gory with a high number of respondents that did not fare so well is education, which came in as the sixth iowest at $90,700. Other industries rounding out the bottom of the saiary stack (with greater than 50 respondents} include environmental engineering/equipment ($89,000) and equip— ment manufacturing ($90,000). Median Respondents Saiary Saiary Number of Mean- Jot: Function. Construction. Engineering and Procurement 103. $119,319: $114,400 Consuiling; 95- - 5105,9405 ' $95,000 Design 38 5105,3902 $102,750 Education with Consulting 50' $115,604 $105,000 E'diJcaiion wiihout Consulting ' 91- $95,187. $07,000 Equipment. Manufacturing“ 111 ' - 582,235. $85,000 Environmental Engineering 913' - 597,055 $93,100 financeftaw/Llcensingi‘ 23 $168,576 $137,830 information Ma'nagement' 112 ' $116,821. ' $105,000 instrumentation and. Control Engineering 41- $109,090 $107,100 Management-Corporate/General 74 $180,404 150,000 - Operations and Maintenance 75 $113,554 $101,750 Planning and Economics' 23. $133,196 $125,000 Plant Management 65 $117,502 $114,000 Process Engineering 325 $105,034 $100,000 Process Safety, Health 11 Loss Prevention 82 $124,905. $132,501} Product Engineering 34 $96,547 $87,415 Project Engineering ET 599,748 $06,000 Project Management 89 $117,390 $110,000 Purchasing' 8 $122,088 $128,350 Quality Centre? 24 893,175 $84,350 GovernmenlfFlegulatory Afiairs 53 893,100 $156,000 Fiesearch and Deveiopment 355 $105,136 $103,200 Sales & Marketing _ 30 5264.063 5105.550 Technical Service 65 $112,352 $113,000 Other Engineeringfiechnical' 13 597,131 5 $98,000 Non-Technical” 3 585,833 $73,500 Not Reported” 3' - $115,653 $121,000 l‘olat Respondents 2,022 - Overall Margin of Error 2.2% - ' slate: Respondent base is less than the desired threshold (or making valid comparisons. SALARIES BY EMPLOYEE CHARACTERISTECS Years of work experience. Regression analyses show , that the age of the respondent and the number of years in the work force are the best predictors of base saiary. Both Tables 1 and 6 demonstrate this. Every five years in age transiatcs into roughly an additional $10,000 in salary. This is the average mediannsalary increase for successive age groups up to the 51—55 years interval, where salaries peak at $120,000 before reaching a piateau. The targest jump in median salary ocaurs between the 26—30 years group and 36—10 years group, which reflects a difference of $15,000. Similarly, according to Table 1, median salaries start to piateau around the the group with 26—30 years of experi— ence ($120,000) and peak at 36—40 years of experience ($127,000). In general, chemical engineers roughly double their salary over the course of their career. Supervisory responsibilities. Naturaily, salaries tend to rise with increasing supervisory responsibilities (Table 7). However, the separation between the those who supervise and those who don‘t is not nearly as great as one might GEP August 20-07 wiwveichecrg/cep 27 Cover Story ———-->~ .a -- - Number of Mean industry. Respondents Salary AerospaceJAemnauiiCszstronautics' 29: 823.109 Agricuiiural Chemicats 38 $123,492 Alternative Energy Soarcas' 10 $100,880 Automotive 13 504,00 Biotechnoiogyilji'e Sciences 70 898,042 0Usiitesslfinance/Lawr'ineurance' 22 $151,286 Catalysts' 2?" $111,398 Commodity-Chemicals 112 8112889 Specialty Chemicals ' 222 $115,403 Education - ' . - 147 $102,124 Eiectroni'cyCompuiers' 27 S1 12,126 Engincaring/Design/Consirtiction/Consuiting 230 $114,296 Environmental Engineennngquiprnent 61 $313,003 Equipment Manufacturing 51 $92,300 Foods and Beverages 59 5113.142 Forest Producinqu and Paper’ 14 593.936 Government ' ' . 20 593,502 industrial Gases 34 01 15,262 Materials and Composites' 29 597.753 MelaleIMetaiturgicai Products/Minerals Processing" 25 $105,213 Natural Ges' 21 $109,910 Nuclear Energy and Aiiied Heids' 20 $120,321 Oilfield Services and Exploration‘ 12 $121,250 Paints and Coatings” 18 591.857 Petrochemicals and Petroleum Precincts 68 0130.02 Petroieurri Productiorvfiefining 176 $127,800 Pharrnaceuticats 142 $111,527 Plastics andI Rubber Products 50 $103,522 Public tJt‘riities 31 $104,449 Research and neveiopment 52 $90,464 Safety a Health' B 3145.050 Soapstelergents/Perfumes/Ccsmelics' 10 $102,980 Software‘ 19 $109,098 Synthetic FibersitextilesfFiims' B $96.40 Food 8: Tobacco“ 5 $53500 Medical Products" 11 $101,427 Consumer Products' 4 5117.125 Non Chemical Business' 18 597.099 Unctassified' 0 $124,200 Total Respondents 2,023 Overall Margin of Error 2.2% ' Note: Respondent base is less than the desired threshold for melting valid compaisons. expect. The median saimy for respondents who give no reg- ular supervision is $92,750, which is only a little over 8% less than those who directly snpervise a team. Those who indirectly supervise a tearn have a siightly higher salary of $101,100. Salaries for upper—level management are consid- erably higher —— in excess of $130,000 —— and more vari- able, especially for owners or partners in their firms. Education. In 0105i cases, attaining higher education also correlates with higher income, as shown in Table 8. For example, for those with 11—15 years of experience, the median salary for a respondent varies by level of educa- 28 wwwaicheorg/cep August 2007 C553 Median Number of Mean _ Median salary -- 'Age Respondents Salary Salary _ Under as . 42 $59,010 . sedatio- 5109'350 25-30 .. - 172 . senses .- 559,000,; 880 Emu 31435 200 889,672: -- $04,000 - -. 3:15:00 ' 30-40 - 216 809.800 594.000 ' Sjgéusw 41-45 282 $105,047- - $102,500 - - 51112308 40-50 _ 382 3124,36"? 3115.000, 513508 51-55 345. - 3162.214' $120,000 ' swaggm 50-00 - 241 $134,110 - 5120,0003 sou ‘mn 61-65 ' 00 $129,555 $120,150- $155 300 65—?0' . 2B. . . 8133,5131 $125,150 3195350 Over 70' 0 $130,075 $125,500. - 889 Em Totei Respondents 2,023 SQD’UDG Overait Margin 51‘55' gm of Error 2.2% $08,100 ' Note: Respondent base is tees than the desired threshold for 393530 making valid comparisons. ' seaport $05,000 $105,000 tion, as follows: bacheior‘s degree, $89,000; $97,400 master's degree, $94,600; MBA, $9“,250; and PhD, $106,200. Regression anaiysis shows that 398.500 earning an advanced degree does pay off. The median salary for those who hold a BS 5121.000 $122,500 ($100,000) is: 8.4% iess than those with an MS 3195.599 degree ($109,154); 8.0% less than those with an 33190553801“ MBA ($108,700); and 6.5% less than those with 395200 a PhD ($107,000). Gender. The entwineerinO rofcssion contin- 593,050 a a p $101,000 ues to be made up primarily of male empioyees. 3123.03“ According to the Soaiety of Women Engineers (SWE; wwwsweorg), women within the engi- 895'000 meeting profession are heavily underrepresented smy'lsgg compared to their participation in the entire 3102.500 workforce. While women make u nearl 50% P Y 5113.300 of the U.S. workforce, they account for only £091: of total engineers. And even though the number of women enrolled in engineering degree programs has increased, they still lag behind their male counterparts. Correntiy, women make up 20% of BS engineering degrees awarded annually. SWE’S analysis of the gender difference in engineering is representative of the gender data coliected for this survey. Out of the 2,023 respondents, oniy 14% were femaie. Furthermore, while strides have been made to ensure equi- table earnings, there continues to he a wide disparity in income between males and femaies (Table 9). On average, females with up to 30 years of experience make $9,500 less than their male counterparts. The gap is widest at the experi- ence range of 26~30 years, in which females earn $14,400 less than mates. Salary by degree and year of graduation. Aiso number of- Pl’edicuve 0f salary 13 the ' ' _ . Respondents. is'i-IDecile ist Quariiie I'Me'di'an: ' Mean Grd Quartile . 9th De'ciie M 11131165: academic degree 0050;300:500; Responsibility .. . 000. 57.000 74.175 02.700; 04.020 110.000 130.000- earned by the respendeme indimciiy50pewise'anam-.. - "033' "1 05000- ' 02.250.” 101.000. 105.007- 121.500 102.000 based on the year in 0000in Superviseaieam. ' ' 256 __ 72.900 04,750 ' 100.500 100.430 _ 120.000: _150‘000; which [he bacheioris DireciinupervisE Fmiiscvsiection- _- 200: -_ .- 71-000. -_-0s.000.: 105.0001 - 100.003- 125.000 - "150.200 degree was completed ManageaMaiorDepanmenr.' 340i -_ 09.100: 103.557 130.000-- 134.900 151.925 150.000 “ . Divi'sionotF'rogram- - _. " '. ~ : - ' Table w ’Busmms {hm General Managementj'..' - _.: 05: . '. 00.0003 . 110.500 '- '_1'50.0002 -' 332.553 014.000 040.000. more—recent graduates are CwnerorPaiiner'- ,_ -- .' 10:_'._ 3020005 03.000 ._.. 130,000- -_ 153,000 175,000 __-_ 240.000 earning i685 l’h'dl‘z £11053 Glher‘ ' _ . __ 3 ' ' 25.3] ' . 75.930] 82.750. . £35,300. .' 395,092 127.55? 1'47,‘ZGD'_ who gradumed longer Toial Respondents _ ‘3- . 2,023 ' -' .' - - . ' ' - . . I age. There are a couple of mama MW” OfEm' I ' 22% intermfing trends Seen in ' Nate: Hespentient base is less than the desiredihréshold for making vdid'cornpaiisons.. I I this table. It appears that while those who hold PhD’s generally earn more than those with - either a bachelor’s or master’s degree, the table reflects than out of the 38 graduating BaefielUT‘S l3. - MESiET'S . l - ' l .. ' . . years i.eponed Em. laws, me; half Gf these Years'of Work NT Median N Median : N Median N Median show a lower median salary than that of “penance saw” safe” ' _ salary 2 salary ' respondents with eithera bachelor’s or zisssgagfiyem .. . 1:: _ '. SEES _- ' g .233 l :3 22:33. , . -0 tears ' . ' . .- . - - , i . = e, . 16l020years 1113 100.000 :5? 02,032 ‘ 24,133,100 75 114,200 .- - and “135m 5 degrees Show that {hose Wm} 21 to 25 Years.-- ' 12:0 ' "100.000 50 05.1100 30- 103.000 01 119.700 bachelor's degreeseame‘i mommanihose 20i030years - 157.. 117,000 - 00 _' £14,050 i_ 40? 230.500. 00 $24,410 ;' with master’s. 31 lo 35 years __ 131 _120.000 . 74; 120.000 37__ .- 125.000 41 $20,000. .. Coliege graduates. The ontlook is 36to40years _'; 40 _'120,300 37 137.000 10- 105.800 20 320.000 bright for recent chemical engineering Morelhan 40 years" 18 _- 103,500 4 14 127.500 3 T - 103.500 1? 133.7401. graduates. The NationaE Association of TolaiRespondenis- 3 074 . . "441 _. i 202 _500 -' Colieges and Employers’ {NACE Margin elk—W ' 34% . ' 43%, 7-936 434%. Bemiehem. PA; WWVVflaCEWBb-Coml TN=Numher0f respondents: 0013:0731 enougnrsspciisésto perform iabulalionfl ' Summer 2007 Salary Survey. shows that average offers for chemical engineering graduates increased by 5.4% to an engineeringdiscipline high of $59,361 (which is on par with the data found on Table 6 for thOSe under 25 years of age). The other traditional engineering Median ' l disciplines also experienced increases in starting saiary ' Years 0! _ Madiafl 1 offers. Civil engineering graduates saw a 5.4% increase, MEW‘ bringing their average offer to $48,509, while mechanical Less 31“” 5 “35’5- : . ' 73 5am " 169 3700000 engineering graduates rose 4.6% to $54,128. and eiectzical 5'19 Years _ : 51 . 3’5'000 m _ 384'800- . _ enaineerino oraduares increased by 3.2% brinoina their 1145mm. ' I g“- Sgs'fim 157 394'er . a D D _U 7 ’ D a 15—26 Years . " 46 - $92,130 222 $105,090 ' average Offer “P to 333393 21—25 Years -' 'i 30 ' $00000 l 250 8:13.000 According to the NACE survey. the top threa employers - 2540 Years- . ' - I _'.- 35- _- 5105qu i . 328 5120330 '- that extended the greatest number of offers to chemical engi- 31435'Year-5- - - . 10- . 5113300 . 273 5120309 meeting graduates are invoived in engineering services (aver— 30-40 Years " 2- 5130.500 121 . 5126.000 age offer, $57,899). basic chemicals $60,672), and petrole- More ihan 40 Years . . 55 $124,000 nrn—and—coai products ($64,217). The top three job functions Total Respondenls _ _ 204 t 3,730 are prooess engineering (average ofier, $58,959). production Mar??? D? Em. 53% ' 34% engineering ($58,809) and projecr engineering {$59,236}. continues on next page 1‘N a Number of respondents car: August 2007 vmrwaichecrg/cep 29 Cover Story Bachelor's Master’s Phi) Year of Bachelor’s _ Median Median Median Decree NT Satay N Salem N Salem 1905 and 021010 11 5102.000 10 5125.000 ' 24; 5127.750 1900 4' 0112.500 0 5140.000 10 5124.300 195? 0 5150.000. 3 5110.000 0 5121.500 1950 5 5120.000 17 5123.000 13 5120.000 1909 11 5130000 10 5123.900 9 5125.700 1970 10 5120.200 19 5130000 5 5190.000 1971 10 5105500 15 5100.000 0 5104.000 1972 24 5120.000 23 5120000 7 5110000 1973 15 3110.000 25. 5122000 11 5125.000 1974 24 51 3.450 20 5115.000 15. 5123.300 1975 35 5115.000 24 5112.500 11 5131.500 1970 34- 5112950 - 20.. 5124750 17_ 5125331 1977 23' 5100.700 23 $114,700: 7' 5127.000 1970 27 5117.000 32 5110750 '13 5153.000 1979 30 5110.411 32 $125,000 ' 11 5130.050 1900 30 5122.000 22 5110.200 19 5109.037 1901 45 5120000 10 5125.200 23 5122.000 1902 50 5112750 20 5112.200 20 5112500 1953 ‘ 23 5117.500 14 5113.050 10 5110.050 1904 32 5101.000 14 5109.350 10 5110.195 - 1905 27 5103.000 29 590.700 11 5109.500 1900 20 $121,000 10 592,500 10 5109000 1907 27 597,000 15 5110.000 12 5115000 1900 15 595.000 10 5101.300 ' 9 590,000 1909 23 5103000 14 509.750 11 5112.000 1990 10 5100.333 13 593.000 19 590,000 1991 21 593.500 13 590.402 12 595,000 1992 10 594,770 5 593.000 17 597,400 1993 14 594.000 _ -12- 5104.000 11 5114.000 1994 A 0 501.113 " 9 593.300 15 590,400 1995 23 -- 500.000_- 19' 593,000.14 17' 509.500 1900 19 504.000 10 509.000 13 500.000 1997 22 501.000 10 503.000 17 590.000 1990 10 577,000 9 502.000 ' 15 501.700 1999 20 572.700 0 573.024 11 570.000 2000 13 577.300 0 570.075 17 575,000 2001 17 574.100 0 509.500 . 12 559,000 2002 29 ' 570.000 0 500.400 3 575.000 2003' 27 503,000. -9 505,000 - - 111/151”? 2004 24 550.200 0 500.975 1110 2005 10 557.250 5 502.500 7470 Total 007 542 ' ‘501 T N = Number of respondents 1 N/A 2 Not enough responses to perform tabulation 30 vn'meichemglcep August 2CD? CEF’ Current Salary Number of Respondents Median Raise . Less 1113115110000 24 7% 5403033491999 35 2.3% SSUfitJtJéEBBBQ 54' 3.2% 550,000—369,999 Ht} ' 4.2% 370,000—373ng 190 4.0% 500000009999 216 3.8% 550,000-599,999 251 3.0% 8.100300521103999 265 3.8% $1 10.000551 24.999 293 4.2% 51250005149999 282 0.0% 51500000199999 225 4.0% $200,008 or more 6'." 4.2% RAISES Respondents were asked to provide information about their salary increases over the previous year. The median increase among those reporting base salaries for 3-006 is 4%, vaiying from a low of 2.3% to a high of 7.0% {Tabie l1). This salary increase is slightly higher than what it was two years ago. when it was 3.9%. CAREER PROSPECTS As of May 2006 (the latest available data). the Bureau of Labor Statistics (EELS; Washington. DC; wwwblsgov) counted 24,250 chemical engineers in manufacturing {NAICS code 31454; annual median salary, $78,340) and professional, scientific and technical services (NAICS code Sit-35; $81030). The BLS also has a separate category for engineering managers, and reported a total of 5,690 engineering managers in petrole- um—anrl-coal products manufacturing (annual median salary Si 56,990), chemical manufacturing ($102,069) and basic chemical manufacturing ($105,730). The BLS predicts that employment growth for chem— ical engineers will be about as fast as the average for all occupations through 2014. Although, overall employ— ment in the chemical manufacturing sector is expected to decline. the BLS notes that chemical companies will continue to research and develop new chemicals and more-efficient processes to increase their output of exist- ing chemicals. It suggests that among manufacturing industries, phannaceuticals may provide the best oppor- tunities for jobseekers. Furthermore. most employment growth for chemical engineers will be in service indus- tries, such as scientific research-and—deveioprnent serv- ices, particularly in energy and in the developing fields of biotechnology and nanotechnology. Acknowledgment Special thanks to Tim McCrelght, AlChE marketing manager, who spent countless hours setting up the survey and analyzing the data. ...
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AIChESurvey - 2907 AIChE Employment & Salary Survey '...

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