chapter 3 - the self

chapter 3 - the self - Dancing Matt Harding

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Unformatted text preview: Dancing Matt Harding http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matt_Harding Matthew "Matt" Harding (born September 27, 1976) is an American video game developer and Internet celebrity known as Dancing Matt for his viral videos that show him dancing in front of landmarks and street scenes in various international locations. Harding has since achieved fame through widespread coverage of his travel exploits in major print and broadcast media outlets. He is originally from Westport, Connecticut. He began his game industry career working for a video game specialty store called Cutting Edge Entertainment, Harding later worked as an editor for GameWeek Magazine in Wilton, Connecticut, and then as a software developer for Activision in Santa Monica, California and then Brisbane, Australia. Harding claims that a sarcastic joke about the popularity of shoot 'em up games led Pandemic Studios to develop the game Destroy All Humans!, on which he received a conceptual credit. Saying he "didn't want to spend two years of my life writing a game about killing everyone", he quit his job and began traveling, leading to the production of his first video. Harding was known for a particular dance, and while videotaping each other in Vietnam, his travel companion suggested he add the dance. The videos were uploaded to his website for friends and family to enjoy. Later, Harding edited together 15 dance scenes, all with him center frame, with the background music "Sweet Lullaby (Nature's Dancing 7" Mix)", a 1992 world music song by Deep Forest. The original Song that uses lyrics 1.1 from a dying Solomon Islands language was recorded in 1971 by a french ethnomusicologist at the Solomon Islands near Papua New Guinea. The Song, Rorogwela, was sung by a young woman named Afunakwa. According to the video "Where the Hell is Afunakwa" by Matt Harding, Afunakwa died in 1998. The video was passed around by e-mail and eventually became "viral", with his server getting 20,000 or more hits a day as it was discovered, generally country by country due to language barriers, before the launch of major video upload sites. Harding created a second version of the video in 2006, with additional dancing scenes from subsequent travels, called "Dancing 2006". At the request of Stride, a gum brand, he accepted sponsorship[8] of this video, since he usually travels on a limited budget. His videos are viewable on YouTube, Google Video, Vimeo and his own site wherethehellismatt.com. His second video has been watched 10,871,835 times on YouTube as of June 25, 2008 and Harding's YouTube channel is ranked "#92 - Most Subscribed (All Time) - Directors" as of July, 2008.[9][10] Harding released his third dancing video on June 20, 2008. The video is the product of 14 months of traveling in 42 countries. The background music/song of this video is called as "Praan" composed by Garry Schyman and sung by Palbasha Siddique, and the lyrics have been adapted from the poem "Stream of Life" from Gitanjali by Rabindranath Tagore. the poem "Stream of Life" from Gitanjali by Rabindranath Tagore....
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This note was uploaded on 12/01/2010 for the course PSYC 341 taught by Professor Cap during the Spring '08 term at Maryland.

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chapter 3 - the self - Dancing Matt Harding

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