Indonesia - MUSIC OF INDONESIA: JAVA and BALI GAMELAN - an...

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MUSIC OF INDONESIA: JAVA and BALI
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GAMELAN - an ensemble of tuned percussion instruments.
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Instruments of the gamelan: metallophones (bronze instruments) drums gongs spike fiddles - rebab bamboo flutes - suling
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Gongs in the gamelan
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Saron - come in 3 different octave ranges *not on exam
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Bonang - higher and lower pitched *not on exam
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Kenong *not on exam
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Rebab - spiked fiddle
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Laras - Javanese tuning system Two primary types: Slendro - with a five-note scale Pelog - with a seven-note scale Each gamelan has its own unique slendro and pelog scales *not on exam
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MUSIC AND RELIGION IN JAVA Gamelan - rooted in Hinduism, Buddhism, Java is almost entirely Muslim today. Islam - 15th century, Hindu population converted 1800s - Dutch colonizers, but Javanese courts ruled with minimal control
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Example: Ketawang “Purpawarna” (Sanskrit roots) CD 1/track 6 Music has very deep religious meaning The gong is worshipped - on special religious Muslim days, it doesn’t play (Hindu roots in a Muslim society) Players take off their shoes to not offend the spirit of the gamelan (also at the U of Pitt)
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Indonesia - MUSIC OF INDONESIA: JAVA and BALI GAMELAN - an...

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