Chapter25 - STEEL-CONCRETE COMPOSITE COLUMN-I 25 STEEL-CONCRETE COMPOSITE COLUMNS-I 1.0 INTRODUCTION A steel-concrete composite column is a

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
STEEL-CONCRETE COMPOSITE COLUMN-I Version II 25-{PAGE } Fig. 1 : Typical cross - sections of fully and partially concrete encased columns c y c y x y h h c b c b c x c x (a) b c b h = h x y ( c ) (b) c x b = b c y STEEL-CONCRETE COMPOSITE COLUMNS-I 1.0 INTRODUCTION A steel-concrete composite column is a compression member, comprising either a concrete encased hot-rolled steel section or a concrete filled tubular section of hot-rolled steel and is generally used as a load-bearing member in a composite framed structure. Typical cross-sections of composite columns with fully and partially concrete encased steel sections are illustrated in Fig. 1 . Fig. 2 shows three typical cross-sections of concrete filled tubular sections. Note that there is no requirement to provide additional reinforcing steel for composite concrete filled tubular sections, except for requirements of fire resistance where appropriate. © Copyright reserved 25
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
STEEL-CONCRETE COMPOSITE COLUMN-I Version II 25-{PAGE } Fig. 2 : Typical cross-sections of concrete filled tubular sections d y x d y b h y In a composite column both the steel and concrete would resist the external loading by interacting together by bond and friction. Supplementary reinforcement in the concrete encasement prevents excessive spalling of concrete both under normal load and fire conditions. In composite construction, the bare steel sections support the initial construction loads, including the weight of structure during construction. Concrete is later cast around the steel section, or filled inside the tubular sections. The concrete and steel are combined in such a fashion that the advantages of both the materials are utilised effectively in composite column. The lighter weight and higher strength of steel permit the use of smaller and lighter foundations. The subsequent concrete addition enables the building frame to easily limit the sway and lateral deflections. With the use of composite columns along with composite decking and composite beams it is possible to erect high rise structures in an extremely efficient manner. There is quite a vertical spread of construction activity carried out simultaneously at any one time, with numerous trades working simultaneously. For example One group of workers will be erecting the steel beams and columns for one or two storeys at the top of frame. Two or three storeys below, another group of workers will be fixing the metal decking for the floors. A few storeys below, another group will be concreting the floors. As we go down the building, another group will be tying the column reinforcing bars in cages. Yet another group below them will be fixing the formwork, placing the concrete into the column moulds etc. The advantages of composite columns are: increased strength for a given cross sectional dimension.
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/30/2010 for the course CIIVIL WNG 33155 taught by Professor Y.bahie during the Spring '10 term at The British University in Egypt.

Page1 / 24

Chapter25 - STEEL-CONCRETE COMPOSITE COLUMN-I 25 STEEL-CONCRETE COMPOSITE COLUMNS-I 1.0 INTRODUCTION A steel-concrete composite column is a

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online