soc 169 exam 3 responses

Soc 169 exam 3 - What is institutional autonomy Why does Abrutyn feel his theory is important He discusses institutional entrepreneurs extensively

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
What is institutional autonomy? Why does Abrutyn feel his theory is important? He discusses institutional entrepreneurs extensively, and it is clear that he has borrowed some ideas from Eisenstadt. What does Eisenstadt have to say about entrepreneurship and how has Abrutyn integrated these ideas? Seth brings forth a general theory of institutional autonomy; autonomy is a function of the degree to which specialized corporate units are structurally and symbolically independent of other corporate units. It is argued that the process by which these ‘institutional entrepreneurs’ become independent can explain how institutions become differentiated from the ‘inside out’. Seth talks about five dimensions that can be operationalized, measuring the degree to which institutions are autonomous. As the population of a society grows, they all argued, institutional systems differentiate in order to sustain and integrate "the larger social mass. Differentiation is a more pervasive phenomenon occurring at many levels of social reality—for example, at the level of roles positions, identities, groups and subcultures, organizations and resource niches. Institutions are built from various types of corporate units, and so, an emphasis of organizations in their environments offers real potential for understanding how institutions become autonomous through the strategic actions of core organizations. Though Seth’s paper, he offers some generalizations on the dynamics increasing or decreasing institutional autonomy. For, in the end, institutional differentiation cannot occur without the processes increasing institutional autonomy. Institutional differentiation is, therefore, a function of the number of distinctive institutional systems and their degree of autonomy from each other. Autonomy, then, is a function of the degree to which sets of specialized corporate actors are structurally and symbolically independent of other sets of corporate actors. Institutions are one of the basic building blocks of all societies, and as societies have grown in scale and complexity, they have done so by differentiating institutional subsystems—e.g., kinship, religion, polity, law, economy, education, medicine, media, art, and perhaps sports. Institutions are macro-structures because they generally affect all individual and collective actors in a society and resolve fundamental problems of adaptation. For example, law is a useful case because its emergence as an autonomous institutional system is comparatively recent in human evolutionary history and because its degree of autonomy varies considerably across societies. Seth asks, why law exists: what types of historical exigencies lead to the emergence and growth of a legal institution that is an adaptation to these environmental problems? Based on anthropological, archaeological, and sociological evidence, law appears to, in its most complex forms, deal with problems of conflict resolution and notions of justice. It is proposed, then, that
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/29/2010 for the course SOC 168 taught by Professor Lio during the Spring '07 term at UC Riverside.

Page1 / 6

Soc 169 exam 3 - What is institutional autonomy Why does Abrutyn feel his theory is important He discusses institutional entrepreneurs extensively

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online