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Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to navigation Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options CDC Home Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - Your Online Source for Credible Health Information Search The CDC Search Button Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported by your browser. For this reason, some items on this page will be unavailable. For more information about this message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . H1N1 Flu H1N1 Flu General Info What to Do If You Get Symptoms Taking Care of a Sick Person 2009 H1N1 Flu Vaccine Antiviral Drugs PSAs Background on Swine Flu Info for Specific Groups Child Care Programs K-12 Schools Pregnant Women Camps Clinicians Laboratorians Adults with HIV Infection tion arch results helpful to you? Why or why not? or helping us improve our site.
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People in Contact with Pigs Guidance Vaccination Situation Update Past Situation Updates Travel Emergency Use Authorization Images Social Media Related Links What's New Object 1 H1N1 Flu General Info 2009 H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu) and You August 5, 2009 5:00 PM ET On this Page 2009 H1N1 Flu 2009 H1N1 Flu in Humans Exposures Not Thought to Spread 2009 H1N1 Flu 2009 H1N1 Flu
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What is 2009 H1N1 (swine flu)? 2009 H1N1 (referred to as “swine flu” early on) is a new influenza virus causing illness in people. This new virus was first detected in people in the United States in April 2009. This virus is spreading from person-to- person worldwide, probably in much the same way that regular seasonal influenza viruses spread. On June 11, 2009, the World Health Organization (WHO) signaled that a pandemic of 2009 H1N1 flu was underway. Why is 2009 H1N1 virus sometimes called “swine flu”? This virus was originally referred to as “swine flu” because laboratory testing showed that many of the genes in this new virus were very similar to influenza viruses that normally occur in pigs (swine) in North America. But further study has shown that this new virus is very different from what normally circulates in North American pigs. It has two genes from flu viruses that normally circulate in pigs in Europe and Asia and bird (avian) genes and human genes. Scientists call this a "quadruple reassortant" virus. 2009 H1N1 Flu in Humans
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2010 for the course CHEM 2 taught by Professor Gimzewski,j during the Winter '09 term at Ucla Venezuela.

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