Clay - Clay What is clay? Clay is a natural material found...

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Clay What is clay? Clay is a natural material found in the earth. It I the result of erosion, the breaking down of the earth’s rocky crust into minute particles, usually by the action of wind, water or ice. Types of clay There are two types of clay: Primary clays which have a coarse texture and are often blended with other materials to make them easier to work. Kaolin is an example of a primary clay. Secondary clays are finer grained and easier to work because they are more plastic. An example of a secondary clay is Ball clay. Properties of clay Plasticity This is the condition which allows clay to be formed without cracking or crumbling. Clay with many tiny particles is more plastic than coarsely-grained clay. To test clay for plasticity we bend or twist a clay coil and observe whether cracks develop. A plastic clay will not split or crack as easily. Clay to be used on the potters’ wheel should be highly plastic. Shrinkage This occurs when the water around the clay particles evaporates, that is, as the clay dries out. Plastic clays contain more water and thus they have high
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2010 for the course ARTS visa 100 taught by Professor Kon during the Spring '10 term at The University of British Columbia.

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Clay - Clay What is clay? Clay is a natural material found...

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