Transformative Power of Literature

Transformative Power of Literature - changed, and this is...

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Transformative Power of Literature – Seamstress Throughout the book, the Seamstress has been transformed due to the power of literature. The seamstress used to have very simple desires – “I’m not like those young French girls Balzac talks about. I’m a mountain girl. I just love pleasing Luo, that’s all there is to it.” (P.134) This quotation shows us that the literature doesn’t change her very much at the beginning. She is also being realistic when she says, “I’m a mountain girl”. However, she has totally changed her way of thinking later on. Her simple desires become different and more complicated. “ ‘Her latest obsession,’ Luo continued, ‘is to be like a city girl. Next time you hear her talk you’ll find she’s adopted our accent’” (P.166) This quotation shows us that the desires of the seamstress have totally
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Unformatted text preview: changed, and this is also very ironic, since the transformation was what Luo and the narrator wanted at the beginning. The power of literature has also made her become more cultured – “that would have made her more cultured, more refired” (P.57) This was what Luo said at the beginning, and they were starting to mode the seamstress into shape using the books. “transformed, carried away in dream” “having Balzac’s words next to her skin… intelligent” (P. 58) From these quotations, we can see how the seamstress is starting to change. The literature has also given her the freedom the make decisions about her own future – “Seduced, overwhelmed, spell band… Mystery of outside world” (P.101) This is what the seamstress has learnt from the books, and the books have taught her the value of herself....
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2010 for the course ENGLISH 112 taught by Professor Loughlin during the Spring '08 term at The University of British Columbia.

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