ppt8 - 3/8/2009 CEE444: Catabolism 5.14 Catabolic Diversity...

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3/8/2009 1 CEE444: Catabolism 5.14 Catabolic Diversity • Microorganisms demonstrate a wide range of mechanisms for generating energy – Fermentation – Aerobic respiration – Anaerobic respiration – Chemolithotrophy – Phototrophy
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3/8/2009 2 Catabolic Diversity Figure 5.23 Catabolic Diversity Figure 5.23
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3/8/2009 3 Catabolic Diversity Figure 5.23 5.14 Catabolic Diversity Anaerobic Respiration – The use of electron acceptors other than oxygen – Examples include nitrate (NO 3 - ), ferric iron (Fe 3+ ), sulfate (SO 4 2- ), carbonate (CO 3 2- ), certain organic compounds – Less energy released compared to aerobic respiration – Dependent on electron transport, generation of a proton motive force, and ATPase activity
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3/8/2009 4 5.14 Catabolic Diversity Chemolithotrophy – Use of inorganic chemicals as electron donors – Examples include hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S), hydrogen gas (H 2 ), ferrous iron (Fe 2+ ), ammonia (NH 3 ) – Typically aerobic – Begins with oxidation of inorganic electron donor – Uses electron transport chain and proton motive force – Autotrophic; uses CO 2 as carbon source 5.14 Catabolic Diversity Phototrophy : metabolism that uses light as energy source Photophosphorylation : light-mediated ATP synthesis Photoautotrophs : use ATP for assimilation of CO 2 for biosynthesis Photoheterotrophs : use ATP for assimilation of organic carbon for biosynthesis
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3/8/2009 5 V. Essentials of Anabolism • 5.15 Biosynthesis of Sugars and Polysaccharides • 5.16 Biosynthesis of Amino Acids and Nucleotides • 5.17 Biosynthesis of Fatty Acids and Lipids 5.15 Biosynthesis of Sugars and Polysaccharides • Prokaryotic polysaccharides are synthesized from active forms of glucose Adenosine diphosphoglucose (ADPG) • Precursor for glycogen biosynthesis Uridine diphosphoglucose (UDPG) • Precursor of some glucose derivatives needed for biosynthesis of important polysaccharides – e.g., N -acetylglucosamine, N -acetylmuramic acid
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3/8/2009 6 Sugar Metabolism Figure 5.24a Sugar Metabolism Figure 5.24b
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3/8/2009 7 5.15 Biosynthesis of Sugars and Polysaccharides Gluconeogenesis – Synthesis of glucose from phosphoenolpyruvate • Phosphoenolpyruvate can be synthesized from oxaloacetate Sugar Metabolism Figure 5.24c
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3/8/2009 8 5.15 Biosynthesis of Sugars and Polysaccharides • Pentoses are formed by the removal of one carbon atom from a hexose Sugar Metabolism Figure 5.24d
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3/8/2009 9 5.16 Biosynthesis of Amino Acids and Nucleotides • Biosynthesis of amino acids and nucleotides often involves long, multistep pathways
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This note was uploaded on 11/30/2010 for the course CEE CEE444 taught by Professor Wen-tsoliu during the Spring '10 term at University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign.

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ppt8 - 3/8/2009 CEE444: Catabolism 5.14 Catabolic Diversity...

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