All philosophy - 1 A cognitive relativist would argue that(Points 1 there are no universally true knowledge claims there are no universally true

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1. A cognitive relativist would argue that (Points: 1) there are no universally true knowledge claims there are no universally true moral claims there are no universally true aesthetic claims all of the above none of the above 2. According to Socrates, to find universal principles that explain our experiences, one must look for (Points: 1) mythic explanations material explanations linguistic/rhetorical explanations formal explanations none of the above 3. Accounts of the origin of the universe found in the Bible, Hindu scriptures, and other religious text (like the writings of Hesiod) are examples of (Points: 1) mythic explanation material explanation linguistic/rhetorical explanation formal explanation none of the above 4. Adequacy is the criterion for good philosophy that states (Points: 1) the various parts of a theory should "hang together" or work in unison the various parts of a theory should not be logically contradictory a theory should refer to conscious human experience a theory should be able to incorporate new data or experiences that the theory should be articulated in such a way that others can understand it and critique it 5. Applicability is the criterion for good philosophy that states (Points: 1) the various parts of a theory should "hang together" or work in unison
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the various parts of a theory should not be logically contradictory a theory should refer to conscious human experience a theory should be able to incorporate new data or experiences that the theory should be articulated in such a way that others can understand it and critique it 6. Aristotle argues that "language mirrors the world/reality" because (Points: 1) 'things' are always a function of meaning and discourse he was committed to an empirical doctrine of sense perception 'reality/things' exist independent of an historical language (such as English, French, Greek, etc.) a) and c) – Hedgier b) and c) 7. Aristotle recognized that if 'something' existed then (Points: 1) it could exist independent of a principle which defined it it could not exist independent of a principle which defined it it must be made up of atoms and sub-atomic particles all of the above none of the above 8. Aristotle's belief that 'reality is prior to language' does NOT mean (Points: 1) things exist without any definition things can exist because the Christian God made them things are dependent upon human language all of the above none of the above 9. Coherency is the criterion for good philosophy that states (Points: 1) the various parts of a theory should "hang together" or work in unison the various parts should not be logically contradictory – Consistency a theory should refer to conscious human experience – Adequacy a theory should be able to incorporate new data or experiences – Applicability that the theory should be articulated in such a way that others can understand it and critique it – Communicability 10. Communicability is the criterion for good philosophy that states (Points: 1)
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This note was uploaded on 11/30/2010 for the course PHIL 111 taught by Professor Esiwert during the Spring '10 term at Northwest Missouri State University.

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All philosophy - 1 A cognitive relativist would argue that(Points 1 there are no universally true knowledge claims there are no universally true

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