Hispanic American Diversity - Hispanic American Diversity 1...

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Hispanic American Diversity 1 Hispanic American Diversity Yolanda Campos ETH/125 October 3, 2010 Instructor: Vonda Morrissette
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Hispanic American Diversity 2 Abstract The written assignment will mention about the one ethnicity group, which is Hispanic American; there is more than one group of people, which belong to Hispanic American culture. I will be identify linguistic, political, social, economic, religious, and familial conventions or statuses of the four Hispanic group living in the United States which are Mexican American, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, and El Salvadorians. Mexican American “As of the mid-1990’s, nearly 18 million Mexican Americans lived in the United States, representing one of the fastest growing population groups and accounting for the largest share of the 27 million Latinos living in the United States” (“Mexican American Communities,”1998). “Latinos include Mexican American, Cuban, Puerto Ricans, Salvadorians, Guatemalans, and other groups from Latin American” (“Mexican American Communities,”1998). “The growing numbers of Mexican American are not a surprise to social scientist, who noted that this population nearly double from 1970-1980” (“Mexican American Communities,”1998). Already by the mid-1900s, in the school districts of Los Angeles, Diego, Houston, Dallas, San Antonio, Laredo, El Paso, Tucson, and Albuquerque, Mexican American represented the majority of students in the primary and secondary schools” (“Mexican American Communities,”1998). “Comprising 63 percent of the total Latino population, Mexican American accounted for the largest share of this group in the United States, followed by Puerto Ricans at 13 percent; Central and South American at 12 percent; and Cubans comprising 5 percent” (“Mexican American Communities,”1998). “Their status in American society is unique because they can claim both indigenous origins (being among the first in this land) and large population of recent immigrants” (“Mexican American Communities,”1998). “Over a period of 300 years, then, colonial Mexico and its people transformed, culturally and economically, a vast region of what is today the United States but was then a portion of New Spain”(“Mexican American Communities,”1998). “The 1836 Texas Constitution did grant Mexican full right as Texas Citizens, although it maintained the enslavement of Blacks” (“Mexican American Communities,”1998). “Not Until Texas joined the Union in 1845 did Tejanos officially become American Citizens” (Mexican American Communities,”1998). “Latin American Immigrants are much less likely to speak English than earlier generations of European Immigrants because they speak a common language; they are regionally concentrated and residentially segregated within Spanish-speaking enclaves; they are less interested in linguistic and culture assimilation, and they are encouraged in this lack of interest by activists who foment identity politics” (Rumbant, Massey, & Bean, 2006). “He is particularly pessimistic about the prospects of Mexican American Linguistic assimilation: if the second generation does not reject Spanish out of hand,
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