politics 1 - A uthors: S tephens, Thomas M. Source: B...

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Authors: Stephens, Thomas M. Source: Bilingual Review; Jan-Apr1994, Vol. 19 Issue 1, p3, 6p Document Type: Article Subject Terms: BILINGUALISM HISPANIC Americans Geographic Terms: UNITED States Abstract: Studies the significance of English and Spanish bilingualism in the aggregation of American Hispanics into a collective unit. Role of politics; Relationship between the use of the English language and age; Imposition of bilingual education in the United States. Lexile: 900 Full Text Word Count: 3249 ISSN: 00945366 Accession Number:
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9507100012 Database: MasterFILE Premier THE ROLE OF ENGLISH AND SPANISH (BI)LINGUALISM IN U.S. HISPANICITY: FACTORS IN CONSTRUCTING A COLLECTIVITY[ 1] Contents 1. Introduction 2. Language As a Determiner of Identity 3. Is the Hispanophone by Definition Hispanic? Can the Monolingual Anglophone Be Hispanic? The Role of Lingualism and Bilingualism in Ethnogenization 4. Whose Category Is It, Anyway? 5. Notes 6. References Language can be used not only to mark off external boundaries but also internal lines; not only to praise the ingroup and isolate the outgroup but also to single out renegades--those of the ingroup who break cultural ranks to identify with outgroups. The labels used for outgroups and for renegades express a fear of contamination, a disapproval of those who dissent or betray the ingroup. (Khleif 1979:161) Introduction From my experiences as a teacher and investigator, specifically of Hispanic bilingualism and ethnicity, and from the contacts I have had not only with bilinguals but also with specialists in the fields of bilingualism, second language learning, and race and ethnicity, I long ago realized that Khleif's thoughts, as expressed in the above quote, well represent the
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case for the aggregation of U.S. Hispanics into a collective unit. That said, some of what may be forecast with regard to the ethnogenization of the Hispanic and to Spanish language use in the United States may be clarified with some study of the language situation among so-called Hispanics.[ 2] In Western societies, language style and usage reflect the social class, educational level, or ethnic identity of the person speaking. According to Royce (1982:147), "Language is frequently the focus of identification. It is readily apparent that when two groups do not have a common language, language difference is usually one of the first different identities." Not only are linguistic systems concrete forms for verification of group status, but they can also exacerbate intergroup tensions (Royce 1982:156-7). Tensions, even when physically noncombative, mandate a strengthening of boundaries between groups deemed different. With these ideas in mind, one must consider how constraints are established by which Hispanicity is determined vis-a-vis language, be it uni-, bi-, or multilingual in nature. That is, may one's hispanophony suffice for being identified as Hispanic in the United States? Or, can a monolingual Anglophone be Hispanic? The major problem revolves around whose
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This note was uploaded on 12/01/2010 for the course ETH 125 ETH 125 taught by Professor N/a during the Fall '09 term at University of Phoenix.

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politics 1 - A uthors: S tephens, Thomas M. Source: B...

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