MET 34800 – Engineering Materials Chapter 4

MET 34800 – Engineering Materials Chapter 4...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–15. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
MET 34800 – ENGINEERING MATERIALS IUPUI ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY ENT Department
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
CHAPTER 4 THE ROLE OF MECHANICAL PROPERTIES IN ENGINEERING MATERIALS Engineering Materials: properties and selection, 9th ed. Kenneth G. Budinski, Michael K. Budinski
Background image of page 2
It is the purpose of this chapter to increase reader’s knowledge of mechanical properties to the point where he or she will never confuse strength for toughness, or strength for stiffness, or stiffness for hardening. Yield strength Tensile strength Hardness (various scales) Shear strength Fatigue strength Creep strength Stress rupture strength Compressive strength Maximum use temperature Fracture toughness Impact strength CHAPTER GOALS 3
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Upon completion of this chapter, the student should: have an understanding of the difference between strength and toughness have a reasonable knowledge of tensile testing and the properties that are measured with a tensile test machine know how to use mechanical properties in material selection and failure prevention CHAPTER GOALS 4
Background image of page 4
The range of mechanical properties that are important in material selection Use as a material selection checklist Determine which ones relate to desired serviceability Definition of stress Types of stress Stress in a tensile bar Review units of stress: psi, ksi, Kg/mm 2 , MPa, GPa 4.1 MECHANICAL PROPERTIES 5
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Figure 4–1 Spectrum of material properties and how they apply to various material systems (physical properties apply equally to all systems) 4.1 MECHANICAL PROPERTIES 6
Background image of page 6
Figure 4–2 Examples of five basic types of stress 4.1 MECHANICAL PROPERTIES 7
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Figure 4–3 Formation of tensile stresses in a mechanical component as the result of an applied load 4.1 MECHANICAL PROPERTIES 8
Background image of page 8
What is tensile testing? What is it used for? How does it work? Important parts on a tensile tester: Specimen’s pulling/pushing mechanism Grips Extensometer Fixtures Type of loading Definition of elastic modulus Yield strength Tensile strength Determining percent elongation True stress and strain Poisson’s ratio 4.2 TENSILE TESTING 9
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Figure 4–4 Typical universal testing machine 4.2 TENSILE TESTING 10
Background image of page 10
Figure 4–5 Tensile samples 4.2 TENSILE TESTING 11
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Figure 4–6 Tensile test method and the resultant data 4.2 TENSILE TESTING 12
Background image of page 12
Figure 4–7 Tensile test samples before and after testing, and the measurements required to calculate the percent elongation and the reduction in area 4.2 TENSILE TESTING 13
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Figure 4–8 Comparison of true and engineering stress–strain curves and the calculation of the strain-hardening exponent from true stress–strain data. 4.2 TENSILE TESTING
Background image of page 14
Image of page 15
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/01/2010 for the course MET 34800 taught by Professor Flechinsine during the Spring '10 term at IUPUI.

Page1 / 64

MET 34800 – Engineering Materials Chapter 4...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 15. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online