MET 34800 - Engineering Materials Chapter 16

MET 34800 - Engineering Materials Chapter 16 - IUPUI...

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MET 34800 – ENGINEERING MATERIALS IUPUI ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY ENT Department
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CHAPTER 16 STAINLESS STEELS Engineering Materials: properties and selection, 9th ed. Kenneth G. Budinski, Michael K. Budinski
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Upon completion of this chapter, the student should: have an understanding of stainless steels; their metallurgy, basic types, and differences have an knowledge of selection guidelines for using stainless steels in design CHAPTER GOALS 3
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Figure 16–1 Corrosion rate of iron–chromium alloys in intermittent water spray at room temperature. Source: W. Whitman and E. Chappel, Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Fundamentals, vol. 13 (1926) p. 533. INTRODUCTION 4
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Definition of stainless steel Historical development Types of stainless possible in steels The iron chromium base diagram Types of stainless steel Ferritic Martensitic Austenitic PH Duplex Proprietary 16.1 METALLURGY OF STAINLESS STEELS 5
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Figure 16–2 Iron– chromium diagram. Source: A. W. Grosvenor, Basic Metallurgy, © American Society for Metals, 1962. Used with permission. 16.1 METALLURGY OF STAINLESS STEELS 6
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Figure 16–3 Iron–chromium phase diagram for alloys with a carbon content of about 0.2%; the shaded area shows the composition for ferritic stainless steels 16.1 METALLURGY OF STAINLESS STEELS 7
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Figure 16–4 Iron–chromium phase diagram for alloys with about 1% carbon; the shaded area shows the composition for martensitic stainless steels 16.1 METALLURGY OF STAINLESS STEELS 8
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Figure 16–5 Section of the Fe–Cr–Ni ternary diagram for an alloy of 18% chromium; the shaded area shows the composition range for austenitic stainless steel. Source: C. A. Zapffe, Stainless Steels, © ASM International, 1949, p. 136. Used with permission. 16.1 METALLURGY OF STAINLESS STEELS 9
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Table 16–1 Nominal compositions of some special/proprietary stainless steels developed for improved serviceability over conventional grades 16.1 METALLURGY OF STAINLESS STEELS 10
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Table 16–1 Nominal compositions of some special/proprietary stainless steels developed for improved serviceability over conventional grades (continued) 16.1 METALLURGY OF STAINLESS STEELS 11
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Figure 16–6 Microstructure of stainless steel: (a) Type 430 ferritic (b) Type 440 martensitic (c) Type 316 austenitic (austenite grains; ). (d) Type 15-5PH (low-carbon martensite; ). 16.1
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This note was uploaded on 12/01/2010 for the course MET 34800 taught by Professor Flechinsine during the Spring '10 term at IUPUI.

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MET 34800 - Engineering Materials Chapter 16 - IUPUI...

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