MET 34800 - Engineering Materials Chapter 21 - IUPUI...

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MET 34800 – ENGINEERING MATERIALS IUPUI ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY ENT Department
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CHAPTER 21 SURFACE ENGINEERING Engineering Materials: properties and selection, 9th ed. Kenneth G. Budinski, Michael K. Budinski
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Figure 21–1 Reasons for surface engineering INTRODUCTION 1. Alter appearance Color Surface texture/gloss Lay Clean/remove oxide, rust, etc. 2. Alter dimensions Rebuild worn surface Add a protective layer Fix mismachining 3. Alter properties Improve wear resistance Improve heat resistance Improve fatigue resistance Improve corrosion resistance Friction characteristics Biological condition Optical properties Adhesion 4. Cost Lower cost Add value to raise price 3
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Figure 21–2 Surface engineering INTRODUCTION 4
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Figure 21–3 The spectrum of surface engineering INTRODUCTION 5
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Figure 21–4 Comparative analysis volume of different surface analysis techniques. The analysis volume is the depth of penetration times the area over which the analysis is taken. The analysis diameters are not to scale. 21.1 ANATOMY OF A SOLID SURFACE 6
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Figure 21–5 Surface feature scales for common applications 21.1 ANATOMY OF A SOLID SURFACE 7
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Figure 21–6 Important surface texture parameters: R a , RMS, R max , and R z 21.1 ANATOMY OF A SOLID SURFACE 8
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Figure 21–7 The real area of contact for surfaces with low and high c/d roughness. Surface waviness has the most control. 21.1 ANATOMY OF A SOLID SURFACE 9
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Figure 21–8 The tendency of various solvents to leave a contaminating film. The lower the UV number, the thicker the residual film after cleaning. Toluene left the thinnest film 21.2 CLEANING 10
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21.3 SURFACE MODIFICATION PROCESSES Diffusion Selective Hardening Laser treatment Corona Discharge Treatment Ion Implantation 11
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Figure 21–9 Diffusion treatments for surfaces 21.3 SURFACE MODIFICATION PROCESSES 12
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21.3 SURFACE MODIFICATION PROCESSES Table 21-1 Materials that are commonly flame, induction, electron beam or laser hardened 13
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Figure 21–10 Schematic of ion implantation. Source: Courtesy Professor Paul J. Wilbur, Colorado State University). 21.3 SURFACE MODIFICATION PROCESSES 14
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21.3 SURFACE REGENERATION Processes: Mechanical Finishing Machining Grinding Particle Impingement Fixed Abrasive Texturing Third Body Abrasion Tumbling Engraving Remelting Electrical Discharge Machining Chemical Surface Treatment Chemical Mechanical Planarizing Electropolishing Photoetching 15
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Figure 21–11 Mechanical finishing processes 21.3 SURFACE REGENERATION 16
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Figure 21–12 A glass table top showing intentional waviness and roughness for appearance effects 21.3 SURFACE REGENERATION 17
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Figure 21–13 An electropolished stainless steel yarn spinnerette.
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