P219lecture24nuclear

P219lecture24nuclear - Goal: To understand the basics of...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Goal: To understand the basics of nuclear physics Objectives: 1) To learn about Atomic number and weight 2) To be able to find the Size of nucleus 3) To understand Fusion and Fission 4) To learn about Binding Energy 5) To learn about How all the elements are made 6) To learn about the Hydrogen Bomb and other uses for nuclear power such as power plants
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Atomic number (Z) The atomic number is the number of protons an atom has in its nucleus (and electrons if it is not “ionized”). Each different element has its own atomic number.
Background image of page 2
Atomic Weight Each atom has some number of neutrons. The # of neutrons is N. Most atoms lighter than iron have 1 neutron per proton. Atoms with a lot more neutrons than protons tend to be unstable.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Size of a nucleus Each proton and neutron gets squeezed together. The nucleus will almost always have the same density which is the density of matter. This is 10 14 g/cm 3 or 100 trillion times the density of water. As for the radius, since the volume of the nucleus depends on the cube of the radius and the number of particles therefore: • r = r 0 * A 1/3 • And r 0 = 1.2 fm
Background image of page 4
Atoms The density for the total atom includes the electrons, so it is mostly empty space (like finding the density of our solar system). Larger atoms have their electrons closer to the atoms, so their densities are larger. So, while atoms all have the same density of nucleus, they do not have the same density.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Fusion + Fission Fusion is taking two atoms and combining them together. This is the power source that powers stars. Fission is breaking an atom into more than 1 atom. This is what powers nuclear plants. Often time an “alpha” particle is released – which is just a helium nucleus.
Background image of page 6
Binding energy It takes some amount of energy to glue the atoms together.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/01/2010 for the course PHYSICS 21900 taught by Professor Rhoads during the Spring '10 term at IUPUI.

Page1 / 23

P219lecture24nuclear - Goal: To understand the basics of...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online