Mond+10.25+adulthood

Mond+10.25+adulthood - Social and Emotional Aging Susan T....

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Unformatted text preview: Social and Emotional Aging Susan T. Charles 1 and Laura L. Carstensen 2 1 Department of Psychology and Social Behavior, University of California, Irvine, California 96297; email: scharles@uci.edu 2 Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305; email: laura.carstensen@stanford.edu Annu. Rev. Psychol. 2009. 61:383409 The Annual Review of Psychology is online at psych.annualreviews.org This articles doi: 10.1146/annurev.psych.093008.100448 Copyright c 2009 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved 0066-4308/09/0110-0383$20.00 Key Words emotion regulation, aging, well-being, affective well-being Abstract The past several decades have witnessed unidimensional decline models of aging give way to life-span developmental models that consider how specific processes and strategies facilitate adaptive aging. In part, this shift was provoked by the stark contrast between findings that clearly demonstrate decreased biological, physiological, and cognitive capac- ity and those suggesting that people are generally satisfied in old age and experience relatively high levels of emotional well-being. In recent years, this supposed paradox of aging has been reconciled through careful theoretical analysis and empirical investigation. Viewing ag- ing as adaptation sheds light on resilience, well-being, and emotional distress across adulthood. 383 A n n u . R e v . P s y c h o l . 2 1 . 6 1 : 3 8 3- 4 9 . D o w n l o a d e d f r o m w w w . a n n u a l r e v i e w s . o r g b y U n i v e r s i t y o f C a l i f o r n i a- I r v i n e o n 9 / 2 4 / 1 . F o r p e r s o n a l u s e o n l y . Contents INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 384 SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL PROCESSES AND WELL-BEING ACROSS THE ADULT LIFE SPAN . . . . . . . . 385 Social Processes and Physical Health Outcomes . . . . . . 386 Early Origins of Healthy Relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387 SOCIAL PATTERNS ACROSS ADULTHOOD . . . . . . . . . 387 EMOTIONAL WELL-BEING. . . . . . . 388 UNDERSTANDING SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL TRAJECTORIES ACROSS ADULTHOOD . . . . . . . . . 389 Selective Optimization with Compensation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 390 Socioemotional Selectivity Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 390 Life Experience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 390 Strength and Vulnerability Integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 390 AGE DIFFERENCES IN PROCESSING, REMEMBERING, AND ACTING ON EMOTIONS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 391 Appraisals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 391 Memory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 393 Behavioral Responses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 394 AGE, BIOLOGY, AND SOCIOEMOTIONAL PROCESSES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 395 Finding Benefits in Decline. . . . . . . . . 395 The Downside of Biological Changes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 396 Predicting Patterns of Age Differences in Emotional Well-Being . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 397Well-Being ....
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Mond+10.25+adulthood - Social and Emotional Aging Susan T....

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