HPSlecture13+2010 - LECTURE#16 Human Problem Solving AGENDA...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 LECTURE #16 Human Problem Solving AGENDA I. History of Response Time A. Hermann von Helmholtz B. Franciscus Cornelius Donders II. Sternberg Scanning Model III. Shepard’s Mental Rotation Task IV. The Word Superiority Effect A. The Rumelhart-McClelland Model
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
2 I. History of Response Time The idea that the time to make a response in a particular situation could suggest information about cognition didn’t occur until 1800. The received view even in the early 1800s was that ‘neuronal’ transmission was too fast to measure. In 1794 Maskelyne was the Astronomer Royal at the Greenwich observatory. His assistant, Kinnebrook, was fired. Kinnebrook’s job was to look when the star passed a cross-hair. The clock beat every tenth sec. Kinnebrook’s average was .8 sec. slower than Maskelyne.
Image of page 2
3 A. Hermann von Helmholtz (1821-1894) Hermann von Helmholtz was perhaps greatest scientist of the 19 th century. He contributed to physics, physiology, and psychology. He measured neural speed. Helmholtz took a frog nerve-muscle preparation and stimulated nerve at different distances from muscle. ‘Kick’ of the muscle broke a circuit, and times at different distances were collected. velocity=distance/time. For frog approximately 26.4 meters/sec. Later work for humans 50-100 meters/sec. Well, we don’t experience reality when it happens, only later! Decortate frog preparation
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
4 Why Time to Respond in a Task is Theoretically Useful Even simple reactions to stimuli take measurable amounts of time. Cognitive acts may take much longer times, e.g. go through the alphabet in your mind, or rotate your image of the letter ‘R’– there is an upper limit on the speed you can get. The key to using response time theoretically is to select a series of related tasks and study response times in each.
Image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern