Biology unit 1 Ip - American Intercontinental University...

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American Intercontinental University Biology Unit 1 IP
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Relationship between post-fire shoot elongation rate and RGR The growth of the Arundo aegyptiaca was much greater than that of the native species within the two months after the fire. The species showed greater shoot growth in the first year and it is significant when two-way ANOVA has been carried out. The native plant showed no signs of growth immediately and also the growth rate was too slow than A. aegyptiaca. During winter the growth rate of both remained same without much difference (between January and March). The growth of the A. aegyptiaca had been reduced due to the frost that occurred during February 2004. But after that the growth of A. aegyptiaca showed a higher rate than the other species and the increase was around two times higher than native species. The mean RGR for Arundo aegyptiaca was very high in the first 3 months than the native species. The mean value was extremely high (0.095± SE 0.005 g g-1 day-1) after being burned. The native plants showed no signs of growth until the third month and after that they showed only moderate growth rate only. During the spring season the relative growth rate of the native plants were greater than the A. aegyptiaca. But both the A. aegyptiaca and native plants showed very low at the growing season. Production after the fire: The production of A. aegyptiaca had been found much higher than the native species after a year (F (2.295) = 41.236; P< 0.001). When compared to B. Salicifolia and as well as S. laevigata the productivity of A. aegyptiaca was 12 times and 21 times higher in burned areas. But the growth of other species was undetectable because of their lower density. Nutrition in the soil:
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Biology unit 1 Ip - American Intercontinental University...

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