Agamemnon Second Reading

Agamemnon Second - CHORUS 'tsee ,820 Forshe'sliveduptothatname ahellf

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CHORUS        Whoever came up with that name,       a name so altogether true—       was there some power we can't see       telling that tongue what to say,                                                     820       the tongue which prophesied our fate—       I mean the man who called her Helen,       that woman wed for warfare,       the object of our strife?       For she's lived up to that name—       a hell for ships, a hell for men,       a hell for cities, too.       From her delicately curtained room                                                        [690]       she sailed away, transported       by West Wind, an earth-born giant.                                               830       A horde of warriors with shields       went after her, huntsmen       following the vanished track       her oars had left, all the way       to where she'd beached her ship,       on leafy shores of Simois.       Then came bloody war.        And so Troy's destiny's fulfilled—                                                         [700]       wrath brings a dreadful wedding day,       late retribution for dishonour                                                         840       to hospitality and Zeus,       god of guest and host,       on those who celebrated with the bride,       who, on that day, sang aloud       the joyful wedding hymns.       Now Priam's city, in old age,                                                                  [710]       has learned a different song.       I think I hear loud funeral chants,       lamenting as an evil fate       the marriage Paris brought.                                                            850       The city's filled with songs of grief.       It must endure all sorrows,       the brutal slaughter of its sons. 
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      So a man once raised a lion cub       in his own home. The beast       lacked milk but craved its mother's teat.       In early life the cub was gentle.                                                             
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This note was uploaded on 12/05/2010 for the course ENG 265 taught by Professor Courtney during the Spring '08 term at Sam Houston State University.

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Agamemnon Second - CHORUS 'tsee ,820 Forshe'sliveduptothatname ahellf

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