Formal Lab Report - Formal Lab Report Experiment 23...

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Formal Lab Report Experiment 23 Solubility Constant and Common-Ion Effect Shelley Hobbs 8/14/2008
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The common ion effect has helped form the earth’s landscapes. From the rocks you walk on to the Rocky Mountains, to the limestone caves in south Texas. Water helps these minerals slowly dissolve. For some of these minerals this may take millions of years and for others maybe only a few hours. The common ion effect is part of the LeChatelier’s Principle, which is used to predict the effect of a change on a chemical equilibrium. As defined by Wikipedia: If a chemical system at equilibrium experiences a change in concentration, temperature, volume, or total pressure then the equilibrium shifts to partially counter-act the imposed change. If a soluble salt containing an ion common is mixed with a slightly soluble salt we will affect the position of the equilibrium of the slightly soluble salt system. If an ion, cation, or anion that is common to the salt is added to a saturated solution then the equilibrium shifts to compensate for the added ion to favor the formation of more solid salt. The objectives of this experiment is to determine the molar solubvility
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This note was uploaded on 12/02/2010 for the course CHEM 10293 taught by Professor R.ghana during the Spring '10 term at Palo Alto College.

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Formal Lab Report - Formal Lab Report Experiment 23...

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