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1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 [Fi [12 Lin 5.1 —— No PgE [12 CHAPTER 17 Heat Transfer in Manufacturing and Materials Processing RICHARD N. SMITH Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aeronautical Engineering and Mechanics Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Troy, New York C. HARIS DOUMANIDIS Department of Mechanical Engineering Tufts University Medford, Massachusetts RANGA PITCHUMANI Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Connecticut Storrs, Connecticut 17.1 Introduction 17.2 Heat transfer to moving materials undergoing thermal processing 17.2.1 Uniform thermal environment Thin solid model Two-dimensional workpieces 17.2.2 Interaction between a discrete heat source and a continuously moving work- piece Thin plate or rod with a moving planar heat source Thin plate with a moving line heat source Semi-infinite solid with a moving point source Semi-infinite plane with finite size moving heat source 17.3 Thermal issues in heat treatment of solids 17.4 Machining processes: metal cutting 17.4.1 Background 17.4.2 Thermal analysis Tool–chip interface temperature rise Energy generation at the shear plane Assessment of steady-state metal cutting temperature models 17.5 Machining processes: grinding 17.5.1 Background 17.5.2 Workpiece temperatures during grinding 17.6 Thermal–fluid effects in continuous metal forming processes 17.6.1 Background 1231
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1232 HEAT TRANSFER IN MANUFACTURING AND MATERIALS PROCESSING 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 [123 Lin -2. —— Nor PgE [123 17.6.2 Considerations for thermal–fluid modeling in extrusion and drawing Deformation heating considerations Frictional heating considerations 17.7 Processing of polymer-matrix composite materials 17.7.1 Introduction 17.7.2 Processing of thermosetting-matrix composites Thermal model Kinetics model Laminate consolidation model 17.7.3 Processing of thermoplastic-matrix composites Heat transfer Void dynamics Interlaminar bonding Polymer degradation Solidification (crystallization) 17.8 Thermal process control for manufacturing 17.8.1 Control of SISO thermal systems Thermostatic (on–off) control Proportional–integral–derivative (PID) control Software implementation of SISO controllers 17.8.2 Control of MIMO thermal systems State controllers by pole placement State observers by pole placement 17.8.3 Optimal formulation: linear quadratic Gaussian Optimal control: linear quadratic regulator (LQR) Optimal observation: Kalman–Bucy filter 17.8.4 Smith prediction 17.8.5 Sliding mode control 17.8.6 Adaptive control Model reference adaptive control (MRAC) Self-tuning regulation 17.8.7 Parameter identification Orthogonal projection Least squares Nomenclature References 17.1 INTRODUCTION The last two decades of the twentieth century have witnessed a significant move in the thermal-fluid sciences toward studying fundamental problems motivated by applications in manufacturing and materials processing. Establishment of a number
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