The Legal Crisis of Next Generation Robots - On Safety Intelligence (2007)

The Legal Crisis of - The Legal Crisis of Next Generation Robots On Safety Intelligence Yueh-Hsuan Weng National Chiao Tung University College of

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Legal Crisis of Next Generation Robots: On Safety Intelligence Yueh-Hsuan Weng National Chiao Tung University College of Computer Science 1001 Ta Hsueh Rd. Hsinchu 300, Taiwan [email protected] Chien-Hsun Chen National Chiao Tung University College of Computer Science 1001 Ta Hsueh Rd. Hsinchu 300, Taiwan [email protected] Chuen-Tsai Sun National Chiao Tung University College of Computer Science 1001 Ta Hsueh Rd. Hsinchu 300,Taiwan [email protected] ABSTRACT Robot intelligence architecture has advanced from action intelligence to autonomous intelligence, whereby robots can adapt to complex environments and interact with humans. This technology, considered central to next generation robots (NGRs), will become increasingly visible in many human service scenarios in the next two decades. Accordingly, there is an emerging need to predict and address intertwined technological and legal issues that will arise once NGRs become more commonplace. Safety issues will be of particular interest from a legal viewpoint. As robots become more capable of autonomous behavior, regulations associated with industrial robots will no longer be effective. In this paper we will discuss issues associated with autonomous robot behavior regulations associated with the concept of safety intelligence (SI). We believe the SI concept (one of several robot sociability problems ) is crucial to the development of “robot law” that will accompany the establishment of a society in which humans and robots co-exist. Keywords Safety Intelligence, Safety Engineering, Robot Intelligence, Human-Robot Co-Existence Society, Robot Law. 1. INTRODUCTION The novelist and playwright Karel Capek created the word robot from the Czech term robota , meaning “forced labor” or “dreary work.” He first used the word in his 1920 drama entitled R.U.R. —an acronym for Rossum’s Universal Robots , the name of a fictitious factory that produced machines with human-like shapes but without self-awareness or the ability to think.[1] Five decades passed before robots started to appear in industrial settings. The machines used action intelligence , an artificial intelligence concept whereby industrial robots perform simple, repetitive, and labor-intensive tasks. These robots lacked the ability to adapt to changes in their environments or to interact with people. At the end of the twentieth century, the letters AI were more commonly used to represent artificial or autonomous intelligence , which enables robots to perform tasks in unstructured environments. Breazeal [2] classifies autonomous robot behaviors and social capabilities along a low-to-high sociability scale: as tools, cyborg extensions, avatars, and sociable partners. The final category is the focus of this paper, although we will use the term next generation robot , or NGR.[3] According to the Japanese Robot Policy Committee (RPC, established by the country’s Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, or METI), NGRs consist of a)
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/29/2010 for the course DEC 123 taught by Professor Fr during the Spring '10 term at ENS Cachan.

Page1 / 5

The Legal Crisis of - The Legal Crisis of Next Generation Robots On Safety Intelligence Yueh-Hsuan Weng National Chiao Tung University College of

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online