Lecture 16. Interspecific interactions- predation posted

Lecture 16. - Intraspecific Population controls Natural selection Individual Interactions Interactions Interspecific interactions interactions

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Individual Individual Interactions Interactions Intraspecific Population controls Natural selection Interspecific Inter specific interactions - interactions between individuals from two different species
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N time K Why study interspecific interactions? Why study interspecific interactions? They are important for population regulation! Beneficial interactions among species may be able to increase K. Competition for a shared resource can reduce carrying capacity. Predators or parasites can keep N below K or even cause local extinction.
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_ _ 0 + + 0 Effect of interaction on species A Effect of interaction on species B Competition Amensalism Predation / Parasitism Amensalism Predation / Parasitism Commensalism/ Facilitation Commensalism/ Facilitation Mutualism Neutral Inter specific interactions - interactions between individuals from two different species
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Predation Species Interactions + 0 + 0 - Mutualism Competition Species interactions are often _conditional_ !
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If interspecific interactions act as agents of natural selection, _the traits that we see confer benefits that increase fitness that increase interaction. ______________________ ____________________________ QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime™ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. Organisms with these traits survive better and reproduce more than those without these traits and thus leave more offspring
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Example of prey evolution in response to predators: Black to the peppered moth… You can act as a predator and cause the moth populations to evolve at this website (Bird’s view) http://www.techapps.net/interactives/pepperMoths.swf
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Prickly Pear cactus ( Opuntia stricta ) In Australia - introduced from N.A. to Australia in the mid-1800’s: Covered 24 million Ha (hectars) by 1930. After deliberate introduction of
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This note was uploaded on 11/29/2010 for the course BIOLOGY 1211 taught by Professor Patricelli during the Fall '10 term at UC Davis.

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Lecture 16. - Intraspecific Population controls Natural selection Individual Interactions Interactions Interspecific interactions interactions

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