Q12 - heart pounding and the feeling of fear at the same...

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Young Geon Kim A08902081 Question #12 According to the James-Lange Theory, perceiving the dragon stimulates my body to react to its humongous size, sharp fangs and the flame thrower that would melt me down at the instant. My mouth gets dry, heart starts to pound, and my face gets soaked with sweat. My body realizes that such physiological reactions happen when I am about to feel fearful. Recognizing the same pattern of my bodily changes, my body then brings about psychological changes from normal to fearful. The bodily changes are associated with feeling fear, According to the Cannon-Bard Theory, as I perceive the dragon approaching, my brain tells the body and the emotion to respond simultaneously. Unlike the James-Lange Theory, I feel my
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Unformatted text preview: heart pounding and the feeling of fear at the same time. And according to the Two-Factor Theory of Schachter and Singer, I first start to sweat and the heart rate goes up as I perceive the dragon approaching. Then I start to think what the dragon is going to do to me. I imagine the dragon biting my head off, or it firing its flame at me. Then I start to feel fearful by the fact that I am going to die by that dragon. According to Magus William James, I should feel braver when I constantly tell myself that I am actually brave. He told me that bodily changes do not have much effect on how I feel, but rather intensify my emotion. He advised me not to care much about my bodily change, so I tried to fix my mindset to being a brave warrior....
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This note was uploaded on 11/30/2010 for the course PYCH pych1 taught by Professor Chenier during the Fall '10 term at UCSD.

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