Cap 3_Lect 6 - Universidad de Puerto Rico Recinto de Ro...

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Universidad de Puerto Rico Recinto de Río Piedras Escuela Graduada de Administración de Empresas ADMI 6637 Chapter 3 Lecture 6 Melissa González Montañez 501-09-3253 October 18, 2010
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1. Explain the fundamentals of the five principles for ethical reasoning that Weiss discusses. According to Weiss, there are five principles for ethical reasoning and they include: utilitarianism, universalism, rights, justice, and virtue. The first principle, utilitarianism, can be defined as an action that is determined good or bad based on its results or consequences. Utilitarianism uses three dogmas. The first one states that an action in considered morally correct if ends in the best results for a majority of the people. The second dogma states that an action is morally correct if the net benefits outweigh the costs for all those affected in comparison to the net benefits of all the other options. The last dogma states that an action is morally correct if it benefits the majority of individuals and if these benefits outweigh the costs and benefits of alternatives. Utilitarianism also uses two criteria, one based on rules and the other based on actions. The criterion based on rules affirms that you use general principles as measure to decide the greatest possible benefits. The criterion based on actions analyzes an action or behavior to determine if you can reach the best value or results. The second principle, universalism, can be defined as an event where the ends do not justify the means of an action. This principle also states that you should always do what is correct even if doing something wrong would bring the best benefits for the majority of people. Universalism is based on universal concepts, such as justice, rights, equality, honesty, and respect. There is also an imperative category that consists of two parts within this principle. The first part states that a person should decide to act if and only if they can envision that if everyone on earth were in the same situation, they would act in the exact same manner. The second part declares that during an ethical dilemma, a person should act in a manner that respects and treats all others as ends just as well as means for a situation. The third principle,
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This note was uploaded on 11/30/2010 for the course ADMI 6637 taught by Professor Shields during the Spring '10 term at University of Warsaw.

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Cap 3_Lect 6 - Universidad de Puerto Rico Recinto de Ro...

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