Quiz_4_002_answers

Quiz_4_002_answers - Compatibilism: Free will is compatible...

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NAME: ______________________________ LANGARA COLLEGE Philosophy 1101: Introduction to Philosophy Answers to Quiz #4 TIME: 30 minutes Section 002 November 10, 2010 1. True or false ? T/F a. Causation and determination are basically the same relation. F b. Libertarians like Kane think that our actions are caused, but not always determined by those causes. T c. “C caused E” means that if C had not occurred, then E would not have occurred either. F d. The consequence argument is an argument for incompatibilism. T e. In some cases, a later event determines an earlier one. T f. Soft determinists believe that all our actions are determined by prior causes. T g. Libertarians think that our free actions are completely uncaused. F h. All determinists believe that free will is an illusion. F
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2. Define the views below: Libertarianism: We have free will, and this is incompatible with determinism
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Unformatted text preview: Compatibilism: Free will is compatible with determinism Hard determinism: Determinism is true and (hence) we have no free will 3. Summarise the consequence argument If determinism is true, then all our actions are determined by causes that existed before we were born, together with the laws of physics. But we have no control over such ancient events, nor any control over the laws of physics. Hence we have no control over our actions. So free will is incompatible with determinism. 4. How does W. T. Stace define free will? Free actions are those immediately caused by psychological states within the agent. 5. How, according to Baron dHolbach, does a person make a choice? The will has no power of its own. It is passive, being acted upon by desires. The strongest desire will overcome weaker ones, deterministically causing a certain choice....
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Quiz_4_002_answers - Compatibilism: Free will is compatible...

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