Ch 05 Dynamics of Uniform Circular Motion

Ch 05 Dynamics of Uniform Circular Motion - Chapter 5...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–14. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 5 Dynamics of Uniform Circular Motion
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
5.1 Uniform Circular Motion DEFINITION OF UNIFORM CIRCULAR MOTION Uniform circular motion is the motion of an object traveling at a constant speed on a circular path.
Background image of page 2
5.1 Uniform Circular Motion Let T be the time it takes for the object to travel once around the circle. v r T = 2 π r
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
5.1 Uniform Circular Motion Example 1: A Tire-Balancing Machine The wheel of a car has a radius of 0.29m and it being rotated at 830 revolutions per minute on a tire-balancing machine. Determine the speed at which the outer edge of the wheel is moving. revolution min 10 2 . 1 min s revolution 830 1 3 × = s 072 . 0 min 10 2 . 1 3 = × = T ( ) s m 25 s 072 . 0 m 0.29 2 2 = = = π T r v
Background image of page 4
5.2 Centripetal Acceleration In uniform circular motion, the speed is constant, but the direction of the velocity vector is not constant. o 90 = + β α o 90 = θ β=
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
5.2 Centripetal Acceleration r t v v v Δ = Δ r v t v 2 = Δ Δ r v a c 2 =
Background image of page 6
5.2 Centripetal Acceleration The direction of the centripetal acceleration is towards the center of the circle; in the same direction as the change in velocity. r v a c 2 =
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
5.2 Centripetal Acceleration Conceptual Example 2: Which Way Will the Object Go? An object is in uniform circular motion. At point O it is released from its circular path. Does the object move along the straight path between O and A or along the circular arc between points O and P ?
Background image of page 8
The centripetal force is the name given to the net force required to keep an object moving on a circular path.
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
5.2 Centripetal Acceleration Example 3: The Effect of Radius on Centripetal Acceleration The bobsled track contains turns with radii of 33 m and 24 m. Find the centripetal acceleration at each turn for a speed of 34 m/s. Express answers as multiples of . s m 8 . 9 2 = g
Background image of page 10
5.2 Centripetal Acceleration r v a c 2 = () g a c 6 . 3 s m 35 m 33 s m 34 2 2 = = = g a c 9 . 4 s m 48 m 24 s m 34 2 2 = = =
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
5.3 Centripetal Force = a F r r m m = F a r r Recall Newton’s Second Law When a net external force acts on an object of mass m , the acceleration that results is directly proportional to the net force and has a magnitude that is inversely proportional to the mass. The direction of the acceleration is the same as the direction of the net force.
Background image of page 12
5.3 Centripetal Force Thus, in uniform circular motion there must be a net force to produce the centripetal acceleration.
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 14
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 46

Ch 05 Dynamics of Uniform Circular Motion - Chapter 5...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 14. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online