16 Food safety PP - Copy

16 Food safety PP - Copy - Most slides in this presentation...

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1 Food Safety Considerations for Fruits and Vegetables…. Perspective of a non-microbiologist Marita Cantwell Dept. Plant Sciences, UCDavis micantwell@ucdavis.edu http:// http:// postharvest.ucdavis.edu PLS172 Oct 30, 2009 Linda J. Harris , Dept. Food Science & Tech., UC Davis Trevor Suslow , Dept. Plant Sciences, UC Davis Jim Gorny , formerly Postharvest Technology Center, UC Davis, now FDA www.ucfoodsafety.ucdavis.edu www.ucgaps.ucdavis.edu UCD Center for Produce Safety: http://cps.ucdavis.edu/ Most slides in this presentation are from Trevor Suslow We are handling food! We deal with food contact surfaces! Recent UC Food Safety Extension Brochures Food Safety Challenges Food Safety Challenges Chemical Chemical residues, heavy metals Physical Glass, wood, etc . Biological Microbial Allergens Toxins Naturally occurring Produced by fungi 1998-2008 (as of Aug 2008) Fresh Produce Outbreaks by Commodity Fresh Produce Outbreaks by Commodity Tomatoes 14 Cantaloupe 9 Melons 1 Honeydew melon 2 Raspberries 5 Romaine lettuce 6 Lettuce 12 Mixed lettuce 1 Cabbage 1 Spinach 2 Green onions 3 Mango 2 Almonds 2 Parsley 2 Basil 4 Green grapes 1 Snow Peas 1 Basil or Mesclun 2 Squash 1 Unknown 3 Summarized by Trevor Suslow 1998 – 2006 Produce Outbreaks Lettuce/leafy greens Tomatoes Cantaloupe Herbs Green Onion Other 30% 17% 13% 11% 24% 5% Top 5 produce items make up 76% of outbreaks
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2 Foodborne Outbreaks Vehicle Categories 1996 - 2005 6,572 234 Eggs 2,567 120 Seafood 1,565 25 Sprouts 8,151 64 Produce 3,026 43 Processed foods Illnesses Outbreaks Category Most foodborne illnesses/outbreaks go unreported or uninvestigated In E. coli O157:H7 outbreaks a multiplication factor of 20 is often used to calculate actual cases. FDA, 2006 What did you have for lunch ---5 days ago? ---3 weeks ago? Have outbreaks increased and if so, why? Salmonella species E. coli O157:H7; EHEC Shigella species Bacillus cereus Listeria monocytogenes Vibrio cholera Hepatitis A virus Norwalk-like virus Examples of Harmful Microorganisms of Concern in Fresh Produce Bacteria Viruses Cyclospora Cryptosporidium Giardia Toxoplasma Parasites FDA The "Bad Bug Book“ http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~mow/intro.html Selected Enteric (Fecal) Pathogens Pathogen Multiply in Foods? Enteric Source Infectious Dose Sequelae Salmonella spp. YES human animals 10 - 100,000 Reactive arthritis E. coli O157:H7 YES human animals 10 - 1,000 HUS Shigella YES Human 10 - 100 Dysentery Cryptosporidium NO human animals <20 Severe diarrhea Hepatitis A NO human 10 - 100 Jaundice Bacteria Protozoa Virus Growth of E. coli O157:H7 on Wounded Spinach Leaves: Temperature 0.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 6.0 7.0 8.0 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 Incubation time (hours) Log CFU/4cm 2 5 ˚C 10 ˚C 15 ˚C 20 ˚C 29 ˚C 37 ˚C ~ 1.2 dbl/h @ 20 o C Suslow, 2006
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3 • Have occurred at: – Production – Packing – Processing – Final preparation Contamination MOST important factor • Temperature abuse SOMETIMES contributes – Most critical in low-acid fruits and vegetables • Pathogens can multiply when fruit or vegetable cut – Only critical with bacteria
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16 Food safety PP - Copy - Most slides in this presentation...

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