3 Organs - Development, Stems

3 Organs - Development, Stems - Lecture: 3 BioSci 1C...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture: 3 BioSci 1C Apr.2.07 Plant Organs, Stems and Leaves Plant organs: Simple and complex tissues form structures know as organs. Organ consist of several types of tissues adapted to from a specific sets of functions. The organs in Vascular plants: Stems, leaves, roots, flowers & fruits. Nonvascular plants have stemlike, leaflike and rootlike organs. Plant Body A: Roots Anchor the plant to substrate. Water and nutrient uptake. Sometime function as storage organ. B: Stems Support the aerial parts. Raising leaves up to optimize the surface area for photosynthesis. A conduit for transport of sugar and water etc. Green stems carry photosynthesis. Some stems are specialized to store water etc. C: Leaves Primary organ to manufacture and export food. Collect light energy (photosynthesis). Regulate gas exchange. 1-Vegetative organs: Plant Body A: Flowers Structures in most advanced plants (called angiosperms) that facilitate reproduction. B: Fruits Houses and nurtures seeds and facilitate seed distribution into the environment. 2-reproductive organs: Plant Body Primary development Process of elongation and development. Secondary development Adding on to support the existence of more and more living matter as the plant gets taller. Secondary growth does NOT add to the length of the roots and stems but rather to the thickness (circumference) of roots and stems. The seed is often inactive (dormant = asleep) immediately after it is produced. The plants life begins when the seed germinates. The root often emerges first and later the young shoot (stem + leaves) emerges. Fig. 14-9, p. 219 young shoot epicotyl hypocotyl lateral roots primary root hypocotyl radicle cotyledon seed coat Embryos give rise to stems, leaves and roots A seed plant begins as a fertilized egg, or zygote, that grow into an embryo within the seed. the seed....
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3 Organs - Development, Stems - Lecture: 3 BioSci 1C...

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