15 Fungi I - (unique among fungi • disease caused by one...

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The Fungi
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Fig. 18-3, p. 295 Common ancestor Eukarya Bacteria Archaea Animals Fungi Plants
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Characteristics of Fungi composed of hyphae (mass of hyphae = a mycelium) hyphae of most species are separated by septa hyphae lacking septa are coenocytic cell walls of fungi contain chitin fungi are heterotrophic and obtain their food by absorption ( exozymes ) fungi reproduce both sexually and asexually fungi have a zygotic life cycle that includes separate steps of plasmogamy and karyogamy
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Fig. 18-3, p. 295 Common ancestor Eukarya Bacteria Archaea Animals Fungi Plants
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Fig. 20-11, p. 344 Basidiomycota Ascomycota dikaryotic stage septate hyphae Glomeromycota 5% of named fungal species 95% of named fungal species dikaryomycetes (higher fungi) coenomycetes (lower fungi) Zygomycota Chytridiomycota
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Phylum Chytridiomycota • ~1000 named species, relatively unfamiliar (none cause human disease) • possess flagellated swimming cells
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Unformatted text preview: (unique among fungi) • disease caused by one chytrid species is implicated in mass amphibian die-offs Phylum Glomeromycota • until recently, grouped with Zygomycota • ~157 named species (but likely more) • form symbiotic associations with >80% of wild plants, and are even seen in the oldest plant fossils • sexual reproduction is unknown (make asexual mitospores ) Endomycorrhizae Refers to the type of symbiotic association between a Glomeromycete and a plant root The fungal hyphae penetrate inside root cells (but not cell membrane) to form an arbuscule May be mutualistic or parasitic, depending on conditions Endomycorrhizae in root cells Phylum Zygomycota • ~1100 named species • economically important as food storage pests •example of a (relatively) simple fungal life cycle...
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15 Fungi I - (unique among fungi • disease caused by one...

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