ch_12 - Chapter 12 Solutions Why do certain substances...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 12 Solutions Why do certain substances dissolve in water while others do not? Why do “likes dissolve likes?” Recall: A solution is a homogeneous mixture of 2 or more substances. Can be a solid, liquid or a gas A homogeneous mixture is uniform throughout (it has the same concentration throughout) Figure 12.434c A solution consists of the solvent and one or more solutes . NaCl dissolving in H 2 O Figure 12.438a Hydration/Solvent Cages • Energetics of Solvation: Solvation forces overcome intermolecular forces in solvent and solute 1. Enthalpy effects: Solute Separation (endothermic) Solvent Separation (endothermic) Solvation (exothermic) 2. Entropy effects: Randomness often drives dissolving process Entire Dissolution Process Solute-Separation Step Solvent-Separation Step Solvation Step Energy Diagram Figure 12.441c Figure 12.442a Energy diagram for LiCl dissolving in H 2 O Figure 12.442b Figure 12.444a Entropy effects Entropy: the tendency for a system to go from a more ordered to a less ordered state Dissolving a solid solute into a solvent generally results in an increase in entropy for the system Figure 12.446aFigure 12....
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This note was uploaded on 04/03/2008 for the course ENGL 101 taught by Professor Hogstat during the Spring '08 term at New Mexico.

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ch_12 - Chapter 12 Solutions Why do certain substances...

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