Paper-Albert - Book Review ALBERT WOLF John Lewis Gaddis...

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Book Review ALBERT WOLF John Lewis Gaddis. The Long Peace: Inquiries into the History of the Cold War. New York: Oxford University Press, 1987. In The Long Peace: Inquiries into the History of the Cold War John Lewis Gaddis surveys the two-hundred year history of Russo-American relations with a special emphasis upon the Cold War. In Gaddis’ view, the Cold War was an unprecedented epoch of superpower stability and great power peace. Despite the “unjust and wholly artificial character of the post-World-War-Two settlement,” forty years of arms races, destructive wars on the periphery, and intense ideological rivalry a major war never broke out between the Soviet Union and the United States. Gaddis says that this is an impressive feat given the fact that after a comparable period of time the international systems constructed by Metternich and Bismark were in the midst of disintegration and collapse (Gaddis, 216-217). Each of the essays in The Long Peace has appeared in print before or has been presented at conferences. Each merit a full-length book review due to the number of topics each one covers and attempts to analyze. Every essay builds upon the next in order to prepare the reader for the book’s magnum opus and final chapter, “The Long Peace: Elements of Stability in the Postwar International System.” In “Legacies: Russian-American Relations Before the Cold War,” Gaddis examines the lone record of Russo-American cooperation. He cites the tacit Russo-American alliance against the British Empire in the nineteenth century and Russian and American efforts to work
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