6 - DNS - Last Lecture Unix Network Programming Berkeley...

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Last Lecture ! Unix Network Programming ! Berkeley Socket API SUNY at Buffalo; CSE 489/589 – Modern Networking Concepts; Fall 2010; Instructor: Hung Q. Ngo 1
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This Lecture ! Start the Application Layer ! DNS SUNY at Buffalo; CSE 489/589 – Modern Networking Concepts; Fall 2010; Instructor: Hung Q. Ngo 2
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TCP/IP Protocol Suite SUNY at Buffalo; CSE 489/589 – Modern Networking Concepts; Fall 2010; Instructor: Hung Q. Ngo 3 Supports Network Applications Transports applications’ messages TCP: connection-oriented, reliable UDP: connectionless, unreliable Routes data packets from hosts to hosts IP: Internet Protocol, and many routing protocols Deals with algorithms to achieve reliable, efficient communication between two adjacent machines Moves raw bits (0/1) between adjacent nodes depending on the physical medium used
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The Application Layer SUNY at Buffalo; CSE 489/589 – Modern Networking Concepts; Fall 2010; Instructor: Hung Q. Ngo 4 application transport network data link physical application transport network data link physical application transport network data link physical
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A Network Application ! Is a set of processes communicating over a network ! Web clients and servers ! Mail clients and servers ! FTP clients and servers ! File sharing programs ! DNS clients and servers ! Within the same host ! Processes can communicate using IPC mechanisms ! Over the network ! Processes make use of services provided by the transport layer (UDP, TCP, etc.) SUNY at Buffalo; CSE 489/589 – Modern Networking Concepts; Fall 2010; Instructor: Hung Q. Ngo 5
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Application Protocol ! For an application to work, need a protocol ! Public-domain protocols ! HTTP for web clients and servers ! SMTP for email clients and servers ! Bit-Torrent, Gnutella, etc. for P2P servents ! ! Proprietary protocols ! Real ! KaZaA ! Skype ! The chatty protocol you will implement ! SUNY at Buffalo; CSE 489/589 – Modern Networking Concepts; Fall 2010; Instructor: Hung Q. Ngo 8
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Transport Requirements by Common Apps SUNY at Buffalo; CSE 489/589 – Modern Networking Concepts; Fall 2010; Instructor: Hung Q. Ngo 9 Application file transfer e-mail Web documents real-time audio/video stored audio/video interactive games instant messaging Data loss no loss no loss no loss loss-tolerant loss-tolerant loss-tolerant no loss Bandwidth elastic elastic elastic audio: 5kbps-1Mbps video:10kbps-5Mbps same as above few kbps up elastic Time Sensitive no no no yes, 100’s msec yes, few secs yes, 100’s msec yes and no
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Transport Services Used by Common Apps SUNY at Buffalo; CSE 489/589 – Modern Networking Concepts; Fall 2010; Instructor: Hung Q. Ngo 10 Application e-mail remote terminal access Web file transfer streaming multimedia Internet telephony Application layer protocol SMTP [RFC 2821] Telnet [RFC 854] HTTP [RFC 2616] FTP [RFC 959] proprietary (e.g. RealNetworks) proprietary (e.g., Dialpad) Underlying transport protocol TCP TCP TCP TCP TCP or UDP typically UDP
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This note was uploaded on 12/03/2010 for the course CS 489 taught by Professor Hungngo during the Fall '10 term at SUNY Buffalo.

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6 - DNS - Last Lecture Unix Network Programming Berkeley...

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