11 - TCP connection management and flow control

11 - TCP connection management and flow control - Last...

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Last Lecture: TCP 1. Multiplexing and Demultiplexing 2. Byte-stream service Stream of bytes sent and received, not stream of packets 3. Reliable data transfer A combination of go-back-N and selective repeat, and performance tuning heuristics 4. Connection management Connection establishment and tear down 5. Flow control Prevent sender from overflowing receiver 6. Congestion control (later) SUNY at Buffalo; CSE 489/589 – Modern Networking Concepts; Fall 2010; Instructor: Hung Q. Ngo 1
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This Lecture: TCP 1. Multiplexing and Demultiplexing 2. Byte-stream service Stream of bytes sent and received, not stream of packets 3. Reliable data transfer A combination of go-back-N and selective repeat, and performance tuning heuristics 4. Connection management Connection establishment and tear down 5. Flow control Prevent sender from overflowing receiver 6. Congestion control (later) SUNY at Buffalo; CSE 489/589 – Modern Networking Concepts; Fall 2010; Instructor: Hung Q. Ngo 2
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SUNY at Buffalo; CSE 489/589 – Modern Networking Concepts; Fall 2010; Instructor: Hung Q. Ngo 3 TCP Segment Structure source port # dest port # 32 bits application data (variable length) sequence number acknowledgement number Receive window Urg data pnter checksum F S R P A U head len not used Options (variable length) URG: urgent data (generally not used) ACK: ACK # valid PSH: push data now (generally not used) RST, SYN, FIN: connection estab (setup, teardown commands) # bytes rcvr willing to accept counting by bytes of data (not segments!) Internet checksum (as in UDP)
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SUNY at Buffalo; CSE 489/589 – Modern Networking Concepts; Fall 2010; Instructor: Hung Q. Ngo 4 TCP Options Options is a list of options, in one of two formats: ( kind ) [1 byte] ( kind, length, data ) [1 byte, 1 byte, N bytes] length counts all bytes in the option List of common options: Kind Length Meaning RFC 0 - End of option list 793 1 - No Operation, for padding 793 2 4 MSS 793 3 3 Window Scale 1323 4 2 SACK permitted 2018 5 N SACK 2018 8 10 Timestamp option 1323
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4. TCP Connection Management Connection establishment Allow each end to know the other exists Trigger allocation of transport entity resources Buffer Timers (if any), … Set up optional parameters Max segment size (MSS) Initial Sequence Numbers (ISN) Window size, ... Connection termination Tell the other end you’re done Clean up after yourself (e.g., wait for delayed duplicates to die) SUNY at Buffalo; CSE 489/589 – Modern Networking Concepts; Fall 2010; Instructor: Hung Q. Ngo 5
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o Three-way handshake to establish connection 1. Host A sends a SYN (open) to the host B 2. Host B returns a SYN acknowledgment ( SYN ACK ) 3. Host A sends an ACK to acknowledge the SYN ACK Establishment Using 3-way Handshake SUNY at Buffalo; CSE 489/589 – Modern Networking Concepts; Fall 2010; Instructor: Hung Q. Ngo 6 Each side tells its ISN to the other side.
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Step 1: A’s Initial SYN Segment SUNY at Buffalo; CSE 489/589 – Modern Networking Concepts; Fall 2010; Instructor: Hung Q. Ngo 7 A’s port B’s port A’s Initial Sequence Number Acknowledgment
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