Lecture_2a_to_post [Compatibility Mode]

Lecture_2a_to_post [Compatibility Mode] - Lecture Lecture 2...

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ecture 2 overview Lecture 2 overview degradation/damage of DNA bases spontaneous depurination spontaneous deamination oxidation through ‘natural’ processes oxidation by drugs and chemicals alkylation through ‘natural’ processes alkylation by drugs and chemicals Direct repair of base damage Base excision repair
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Spontaneous decomposition: DNA vs. RNA • all biological macromolecules spontaneously decompose • nucleic acids spontaneously decompose in solution NA is more vulnerable than DNA to decomposition RNA is more vulnerable than DNA to decomposition because of the presence of 2’-hydroxyl group of ribose: makes the phosphodiester bonds of RNA olecules very susceptible to hydrolysis especially in molecules very susceptible to hydrolysis, especially in the presence of divalent cations (Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ ) • hence, RNA is adequate typically for ‘short-term storage’ of genetic information e.g. viruses that use RNA as a ‘genome’, this carrier is short-lived and mutation-prone
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Spontaneous decomposition of DNA vs. RNA loss of 2’-OH group presence of 2’OH group phosphodiester bond more stable phosphodiester bond less stable
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This note was uploaded on 12/03/2010 for the course PHAMACOLOG pcl470 taught by Professor Arnot during the Fall '10 term at University of Toronto- Toronto.

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Lecture_2a_to_post [Compatibility Mode] - Lecture Lecture 2...

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