25_gases - after you return to your ship, you notice that...

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Salts, nutrients and gases Salt: Any substance that yields ions other than H or OH. Salts are ionic compounds composed of cations (positively charged ions) and anions (negative ions). Nutrient: Any organic or inorganic compound used by plants in primary production. Gas: Those gases that enter into solution with a fluid (and are not contained in a bubble).
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Surface Ocean Nitrate 1500m water depth
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Surface Ocean Phosphate 1500m water depth
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Surface Silica-rich Silica-poor 1500m water depth Silica-rich Silica-poor Ocean Silicate
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Draw water profiles of nitrate for locations A and B with 0m at the top of the y axis and 1500m at the bottom, and 0 to 40 along the x axis. Which deep water contains more nitrate. 1500m water depth Surface A. A. B. B. 1 20 40 0
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Water parcel Super- saturated gas Under- saturated gas Atmosphere
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You travel to the bottom of the ocean (4 km) and fill a bottle of seawater. Shortly
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Unformatted text preview: after you return to your ship, you notice that there are bubbles forming in you bottle. Bubbles form because the gas in the seawater is now: A. In equilibrium with the seawater B. Undersaturated with respect to the seawater C. Overstaturated with respect to the seawater Biological Pump 6 CO 2 + 6H 2 O C 6 H 12 O 6 + 6 O C 6 H 12 O 6 + 6 O 2 6 CO O CO Surface 1500m water depth Ocean Dissolved Oxygen Draw a depth profile of the dissolved oxygen content of the North Atlantic and the North Pacific. Why are the two profiles different? If sea water has 1x10-8 H+ ions and 1x10-6 OH- ion, it has a pH of: Add Lysocline CCD Dissolution Production Amount of carbonate 1 4 3 2 5 CO 2 CO 2 Lysocline CCD Amount of carbonate 1 4 3 2 5...
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This note was uploaded on 12/03/2010 for the course ENVIRON GS 222/ENV taught by Professor Ingridhendy during the Fall '10 term at University of Michigan.

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25_gases - after you return to your ship, you notice that...

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