Handout12GeneExpr - Bio 311C Handout 12 Control of Gene...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Bio 311C Handout 12 – Control of Gene Expression Nov 1 – prokaryotes, Nov 3 – eukaryotes How are genes turned on and off in prokaryotes (bacteria )? Section 18.1, figures 18.2, 18.3, 18.4 Learning objectives: 3-53. Some proteins bind near a gene’s promoter and act like repressors of transcription, while other proteins act like activators . What is the effect of each of those on RNA polymerase? 3 54. Prokaryotic cells can have coupled transcription and translation, that is, simultaneous transcription and translation of the same mRNA molecule (Fig.17.24). Why can’t eukaryotes? 3‐55. Bacteria have only one chromosome. Explain why a mutation thus has a more significant effect. 3-56. A bacterial operon consists of what? Are human genes organized in operons? 3‐57. An operon with one regulatory region and three protein‐coding genes will have how many promoters? Related: Explain how bacteria can make one mRNA molecule that contains the code for several proteins. 3-58. An operon has four protein‐coding genes (for proteins A, B, C, D). Which proteins will be produced
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/03/2010 for the course BIO 311C taught by Professor Satasivian during the Fall '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

Page1 / 2

Handout12GeneExpr - Bio 311C Handout 12 Control of Gene...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online