electronic_news - Introduction to Mass Communication(MC...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Introduction to Mass Communication (MC 2000 section 1) Craig M. Freeman
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Big Story
Image of page 2
Best Story Brazil woman pres
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
A Brief History of Electronic News Newsreels Newsreels were short films, usually around 10 minutes long, about the news of the day. They included five or six items of current news, human interest features, and sports events. From WW I until TV became popular in the 1950s, newsreels were shown with the feature attractions in every movie theater. Newsreels mostly covered expected events, such as parades and beauty contests, and residual news stories about events that are recurrent or long-lasting, such as floods, because it was expensive and time- consuming to set up a film crew.
Image of page 4
A Brief History of Electronic News Radio News In 1933, the newspaper industry was powerful enough to force radio networks into the Biltmore Agreement: No morning newscasts before 9:30 AM or evening newscasts before 9:00 PM. No breaking news bulletins from the wire services. Newscasts could not be sponsored. Radio commentaries , which were discussions about the news, were permitted. Non-network stations were not party to the Biltmore Agreement, and several independent radio news services were created to service these stations.
Image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
A Brief History of Electronic News The Biltmore Agreement lasted less than one year. Newscasters, such as NBC’s Lowell Thomas, H.V. Kaltenborn at CBS, and gossip columnist Walter Winchell became radio stars. Radio showed propensity for on-the-spot news bulletins and eyewitness reporting of breaking news, including the 1937 explosion of the German dirigible The Hindenburg. Radio helped newspapers by whetting the audience’s appetite for in-depth newspaper coverage of breaking news heard over the radio.
Image of page 6
A Brief History of Electronic News Radio audiences heard live reports of Hitler’s 1938 annexation of Austria, the 1939 invasion of Poland, and the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor. Radio news expanded during WW II as Edward R. Murrow’s wartime newscasts became hugely popular. In 1946, 63 percent of Americans cited radio as their primary source of news. In 1948, radio demonstrated its advantage over the slower-moving print media. Early editions of newspapers erroneously reported that Republican Thomas Dewey had defeated Democratic incumbent Harry Truman in the presidential election, but radio accurately flashed the news that Truman had won.
Image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
A Brief History of Electronic News All-News Format In 1960, San Francisco area station KFAX (“K-Facts) began presenting news 24 hours a day. KFAX followed a “newspaper of the air” format which was like reading an entire newspaper from front to back, including sports, cooking features, and a “comics page,” consisting of comedy recordings, but the format was a financial failure.
Image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern