Blackboard ch12 stratification

Blackboard ch12 stratification - Chapter 12 Social...

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Chapter 12 Social Stratification
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What We Will Learn To what extent do the societies of the world vary in terms of the equitable distribution of power, prestige, and wealth? How do class systems differ from caste systems? What are the different ways of interpreting systems of social stratification?
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Social Inequality Max Weber’s criteria for measuring social inequality: Wealth - the extent to which they have accumulated economic resources Power - the ability to achieve one’s goals and objectives even against the will of others Prestige- social esteem, respect or admiration that a society confers on people
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Wealth With a net worth of over $50 billion in October 2006, Microsoft’s Bill Gates represents the upper level of wealth in the United States and the world.
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Three Types of Societies Based on levels of social inequality: Egalitarian - no individual or group has appreciably more wealth, power, or prestige than any other. Rank - unequal access to prestige or status but not unequal access to wealth or power. Stratified societies - considerable inequality in all forms of social rewards (power,wealth, and prestige).
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Egalitarian Societies No individual or group has more wealth, power, or prestige than any other. Everyone, depending on skill level, has equal access to positions of esteem and respect. Found most readily among geographically mobile food collectors Ju/’hoansi of the Kalahari region Inuit Hadza of Tanzania
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Egalitarian Societies Small-scale foraging societies, such as the Hadza of Tanzania, tend to be egalitarian.
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Rank Societies Unequal access to prestige but not to wealth or power. Fixed number of high-status positions, which
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This note was uploaded on 12/05/2010 for the course ANT 102 taught by Professor Gray during the Fall '08 term at Cal Poly Pomona.

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Blackboard ch12 stratification - Chapter 12 Social...

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