exam3-2

exam3-2 - Module 31: Introduction to Intelligence...

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Module 31: Introduction to Intelligence Intelligence – Mental quality consisting of the ability to learn from experience, solve problems, and use knowledge to adapt to new situations Reification – Viewing an abstract, immaterial concept as if it were a concrete thing. When we refer to someone’s IQ as if it were a fixed and objectively real trait like height, we commit a reasoning error called reification. Spearman’s g (or gF) – Helped to develop a factor analysis approach in statistics. o Factor Analysis – A statistical procedure that identifies clusters of related items (called factors) on a test; used to identify different dimensions of performance that underlie one’s total score General Intelligence (g) – A general intelligence factor that according to Spearman and others underlies specific mental abilities and is therefore measured by every task on an intelligence test. – Thurstone did not rank his subjects on a single scale of general aptitude. But when other investigators studied the profiles of his subjects, they detected a small tendency for those who excelled in one of the seven clusters to score well on the others. So, they concluded, there was still some evidence of a
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“g” factor. Gardener concluded that a brain injury may limit some parts of intelligence, but not others Savant Syndrome – A condition in which a person otherwise limited in mental ability has an exceptional specific skill, such as in computation or drawing Emotional Intelligence – The ability to perceive, understand, manage, and use emotions Creativity – The ability to produce novel and valuable ideas o Convergent Thinking – Assessed by intelligence test which demand a single correct answer o Divergent Thinking – Assessed by intelligence test which one imagines multiple possible answers to a problem Module 32: Assessing Intelligence Intelligence Test – A method for assessing an individual’s mental aptitude and comparing them with those of others, using numerical scores. (IQ test- or the Stanford – Binet Test) Aptitude Test – A test designed to predict a person’s future performance; Aptitude is the capacity to learn (College entrance exam- achievement test) Standardization – Defining meaningful scores by comparison with the performance of a pretested standardization group o Typically form a normal distribution, a bell shaped pattern of scores that forms the normal curve Normal Curve – The symmetrical bell- shaped curve that describes the distribution of many physical and psychological
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attributes. Most scores fall near the average, and fewer and fewer score lie near the extreme. Flynn Effect
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This note was uploaded on 12/05/2010 for the course MC 2000 taught by Professor Freeman during the Spring '08 term at LSU.

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exam3-2 - Module 31: Introduction to Intelligence...

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